Metaboreflex & Performance in Elite Female Soccer

ECSS is the European College of Sport Science (ECSS). Part of its purpose is to promote junior scientists and foster state-of-the-art research. And in order to do this, ECSS have created the Young Investigators Award (YIA). This award-winning research, presented in the video, is for Metaboreflex and Performance in Elite Female Soccer: Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training.

Video presentation of ECSS YIA winning research

Metaboreflex & Performance in Elite Female Soccer

This research aims to determine the effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) on respiratory and peripheral muscles oxygenation. It examines this during a maximal exercise tolerance test and on repeated-sprint ability (RSA) performance in professional women football players.

Inspiratory Muscle Training

All participants in the study perform 6-weeks of IMT. The device they use for IMT is the POWERbreathe K5 with Breathe-Link Live Feedback software.

At the end of their 6 weeks’ training, all participants are reevaluated.

Research Findings

The findings show that,

“…only the IMT group present lower deoxyhaemoglobin and total haemoglobin blood concentrations on intercostal muscles concomitantly to an increased oxyhemoglobin and total haemoglobin blood concentrations on vastus lateralis muscle during time-to-exhaustion”

Research Conclusions

Results suggest the potential role of IMT to attenuate inspiratory muscles metaboreflex. Consequently, oxygen and blood supply to limb muscles during high-intensity exercise improves. Furthermore, there is also a potential impact on inspiratory muscle strength, exercise tolerance and sprints performance in professional women football players.

ECSS YIA Award

ECSS presents scientists with the opportunity of entering this prestigious competition for scientific excellence, every year. And it’s at the ECSS annual congress where young scientists present their scientific work, as they compete to win the YIA Award.

Following presentations, members of the ECSS Scientific Board and ECSS Scientific Committee, grant the awards. They base this decision upon an oral and mini-oral presentation for the top ten presentations respectively.

Bruno Archiza is the winner of this 2016 YIA award, and his presentation took place at the 21st annual congress of the ECSS in Vienna.

IMT associated with Improved Inspiratory Muscle Strength in Fontan Circulation patients

Like other forms of heart failure, low cardiac output and raised central venous pressure is what characterises the Fontan Circulation. However unlike other forms of heart failure, in Fontan circulation patients the primary limitation is absence of a subpulmonary ventricle.

Affects of Fontan circulation

Patients will experience reduced exercise capacity and respiratory muscle strength. Fortunately Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) improves exercise capacity and quality of life in adults with heart failure. This is evident from previous studies.

Purpose and method of study

The purpose of this study is to assess whether a home-based IMT program improves inspiratory muscle strength and the ventilatory efficiency of exercise in adolescent patients with a Fontan circulation.

To assess this, Fontan circulation patients underwent 30 minutes of IMT daily for six weeks. Exercise capacity (cardiopulmonary exercise testing), lung function and respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure and expiratory pressure) are all assessed.

Study findings

Findings from the study show that IMT is a simple and beneficial addition to the management of Fontan patients. It shows that IMT potentially reduces exercise intolerance and long-term morbidity and mortality.

Conclusions

The study shows that six weeks of IMT is associated with improving inspiratory muscle strength, ventilatory efficiency of exercise, and resting cardiac output in young Fontan patients.

The study

Inspiratory Muscle Training Is Associated With Improved Inspiratory Muscle Strength, Resting Cardiac Output, and the Ventilatory Efficiency of Exercise in Patients With a Fontan Circulation >

Effects of work of breathing on blood flow during exercise

Published in Experimental Physiology this research sought to simultaneously assess leg and respiratory muscle blood flow during intense exercise while manipulating the work of breathing (WOB).

Researchers from Canada & Brazil hypothesised:

  1. Increasing the work of breathing would increase respiratory muscle blood flow and decrease leg blood flow.
  2. Decreasing the work of breathing would decrease respiratory muscle blood flow and increase leg blood flow.

The work of breathing (WOB)

Changes in work of breathing are significantly and positively related to changes in respiratory muscle blood flow. By which it shows that increasing the work of breathing increases blood flow.

On the other hand, changes in work of breathing are inversely related to changes in locomotor blood flow. So decreasing the work of breathing increases locomotor blood flow.

Study findings

Therefore findings from the study support the concept that respiratory muscle work significantly influences the distribution of blood flow to both respiratory and locomotor muscles.

The study

Effects of respiratory muscle work on respiratory and locomotor blood flow during exercise >

New Trial into Effects of IMT in COPD Patients

A new clinical trial will be looking at the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on shortness of breath (dyspnea) and postural control in patients with COPD.

Shortness of breath in patients with COPD

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) experience shortness of breath, or dyspnea, during physical activity. It is related to weakness of their respiratory muscles. There is much evidence of IMT improving breathing muscle function and reducing the intensity of dyspnea.

Balance impairment in patients with COPD

Patients with COPD and pronounced respiratory muscle weakness also show impaired postural balance. But improvements in respiratory muscle function might improve balance control in patients.

Purpose of the controlled trial

The trial will consider whether eight week’s of controlled IMT will reduce the intensity and feeling of dyspnea. It will also investigate if it improves postural control. And finally it will look to see if IMT improves blood flow and oxygen delivery to a patient’s limb muscles too.

Inspiratory muscle training intervention

The trial will use the POWERbreathe KHP2 Inspiratory Muscle Training device for monitoring breathing parameters. And patients will each use a POWERbreathe Medic Plus twice a day, mostly in their home and without supervision. However they will perform one training session each week under supervision, during which the training load will be increased. A sham group will perform three daily sessions of 30 breaths and will train at a constant inspiratory load of no more than 10% of their initial Pi,max.

The Principal Investigator is Rik Gosselink, PT, PhD. The trial is open to all sexes ageing from 40 to 90 years of age. It will take place at the University Hospital Leuven, Belgium. And the estimated completion date for the trial is January 31st 2018.

Influence of IMT on Cycling Performance at altitude

This study, Influence of IMT on Ventilatory Efficiency & Cycling Performance in Normoxia and Hypoxia, is published in Frontiers in Physiology. The aim of the study is to analyse the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilatory efficiency in normoxia and hypoxia. It also investigates the relationship between ventilatory efficiency and cycling performance.

The point of the study

The premise of the study is that IMT improves ventilatory efficiency in normoxia and hypoxia. It also reduces the metabolic demands of the respiratory muscles in both conditions. The study also hypothesizes that improvements in submaximal cycling performance can be linked to improvements in ventilatory efficiency in normoxia and hypoxia.

Study method

The study assigns participants, at random, to either a control group or an inspiratory muscle training (IMT) group. The IMT group were to complete 30 inhalations twice a day using the POWERbreathe K3. They were to do this 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Researchers set the POWERbreathe K3 to 50% of each participant’s Pimax (maximal inspiratory mouth pressure). By contrast, the control group did not perform any IMT.

To determine Pimax participants had to inspire through the K3 as quickly as possible. And in order to achieve a stable measurement they were perform this a few times.

Conclusions for training at altitude

The study suggests a possible positive effect of IMT on cycling time trial performance in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. It also shows that hypoxia has a negative effect on ventilatory efficiency. It furthermore shows that IMT may reduce this effect.

Additionally the authors report that these findings may have relevance for athletes planning to train at a high altitude, or compete at high altitude.

Finally, the study suggests that Inspiratory Muscle Training before a competition at altitude might be a successful method to improve performance.

Efficacy of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Elite Swimmers (PEAK)

This study is a randomized controlled trial. Firstly it will look at the efficacy of inspiratory muscle training using POWERbreathe. Furthermore it will asses the swimming performance, airway dysfunction and perceived breathlessness in the elite swimmers recruited for the trial. Finally the trial will recruit participants from the elite competitive Futebol Clube do Porto swimming team.

Intervention used in swimming trial

    • POWERbreathe IMT

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03062735

Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the Efficacy of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Swimming Performance, Airway Dysfunction and Perceived Breathlessness in Elite Swimmers >

Basketball increases respiratory work which impedes performance

A new original article in the Porto Biomedical Journal looks into the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in female basketball players.

Female basketball players and inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF)

This new randomised controlled trial from Portugal explains how IMF may impede a basketball player’s performance. When the inspiratory muscles fatigue blood flow to the player’s legs, arms and torso are compromised. This affects performance.

Respiratory work and breathing perception

As a player throws or passes a ball they are engaging their upper torso and trunk muscles. They are also engaging their diaphragm as they try to stabilise their core muscles. As a result this increases respiratory work and breathing perception. Consequently the breathing muscles (inspiratory muscles) fatigue.

Benefits of inspiratory muscle training (IMT)

Scientific studies show that IMT increases an athlete’s tolerance to high intensity exercise. It does this by enhancing pulmonary oxygen consumption. In fact wheelchair players report an improvement in performance, as do swimmers.

The influence of IMT in basketball players

The randomised controlled trial investigates this influence of Inspiratory Muscle Training by randomly assigning professional basketball players to the experimental group (EG) or control group (CG).

Players from the EG perform Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) with POWERbreathe. This consists of 30 breaths, five times a week over four weeks. However the CG do not perform any IMT using POWERbreathe.

The EG group show an increase in pulmonary function, which is how well the lungs are working.

Additional benefits of using POWERbreathe for IMT

Findings also suggest that the cost of implementing POWERbreathe IMT is relatively small. Therefore different basketball clubs can implement this intervention with the objective of improving each players’ pulmonary function.

Finally the trial concludes that a 4-week IMT protocol leads to a positive evolution of basketball players’ pulmonary function. Furthermore the results suggest that the applied IMT protocol is effective.

Read ‘The influence of inspiratory muscle training on lung function in female basketball players – a randomized controlled trial’ >