Influence Of IMT On Changes In Sleep Architecture In Older Adult

“This project aims to investigate the influence of inspiratory muscle training through the Threshold® on sleep disorders and involved the participation of 38 older adult volunteers of both genders with sleep disorders.”

Conclusion:

“Results suggested that inspiratory muscle training can be a good help in the treatment of sleep-related breathing disorders.”

Read Influence of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Changes in Sleep Architecture in Older Adult – Epidoso Projects >

The Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Older Adults

“Declining inspiratory muscle function and structure and systemic low-level inflammation and oxidative stress may contribute to morbidity and mortality during normal ageing. Therefore, we examined the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in older adults on inspiratory muscle function and structure and systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, and reexamined the reported positive effects of IMT on respiratory muscle strength, inspiratory muscle endurance, spirometry, exercise performance, physical activity levels (PAL), and quality of life (QoL).”

Conclusion:

“Data indicate that in healthy older adults, IMT elicits some positive changes in inspiratory muscle function and structure but neither attenuates systemic inflammation and oxidative stress nor improves exercise performance, PAL, or QoL.”

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Training The Inspiratory Muscles Improves Running Performance When Carrying A 25kg Thoracic Load In A Backpack

“Load carriage (LC) exercise in physically demanding occupations is typically characterised by periods of low-intensity steady-state exercise and short duration, high-intensity exercise while carrying an external mass in a backpack; this form of exercise is also known as LC exercise. This induces inspiratory muscle fatigue and reduces whole-body performance. Accordingly we investigated the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT, 50% maximal inspiratory muscle pressure (PImax) twice daily for six week) upon running time-trial performance with thoracic LC.”

Conclusion:

“In summary, when wearing a 25 kg backpack, IMT attenuated the cardiovascular and perceptual responses to steady-state exercise and improved high-intensity time-trial performance which we attribute in part to reduced relative work intensity of the inspiratory muscles due to improved inspiratory muscle strength. These findings have real-world implications for occupational contexts.”

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The Effect Of Football Shoulder Pads On Pulmonary Function

“Restriction of expansion of the lungs or chest wall impedes inflation of the lungs during inhalation. Functional changes occurring during such restriction include reduced pulmonary and/or chest wall compliance, decreases in pulmonary function, and ultimately a decrease in exercise performance. Such restriction can be seen in several pathologic conditions such as scoliosis or obesity, as well as occupational situations such as the wearing of bullet-proof vests. This study investigated the hypothesis that tightened football shoulder pads produce decrements in pulmonary function similar to those shown in previous studies involving other external chest-wall restricting devices.”

Conclusion:

“Results are consistent with a restrictive condition and support our hypothesis that tightened shoulder pads reduce pulmonary function. Further studies remain to be performed to determine whether these changes lead to decreased exercise performance and whether equipment modifications can be made to limit alterations in pulmonary function without decreasing the protective value of the pads.”

Therefore it appears that protective equipment increases breathing effort and reduces operational performance. POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training reverses these impairments.

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Comparing Inspiratory Resistive Muscle Training with Incentive Spirometry on Rehabilitation of COPD Patients

“The purpose of this randomised controlled trial was to examine the effect of incentive spirometry in pulmonary rehabilitation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and compare its efficacy with inspiratory resistive muscle training (IMT) technique.”

Conclusion:

“Both techniques improved the mean values of all respiratory function tests (p≤.01). The IMT technique was more effective to improve MVV and PImax (p≤.05). PEFR was better improved in the incentive spirometry group (p≤.05). There was no significant difference for other spirometric parameters between two groups. Incentive spirometry can be considered as an effective component for pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD patients.”

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IMT In Mechanical Ventilation: Suitable Protocols And Endpoints, The Key To Clear Results – A Critical Review

“Forty percent of the overall time spent in the ICU was reported to be devoted to weaning of MV. The major cause of weaning failure is the imbalance between the imposed load on the respiratory system and its capacity to overcome that.”

Conclusion:

“Inspiratory Muscle Training on mechanically ventilated patients seems to be a promissory treatment despite controversial results. Randomised Controlled Trials should be carried out to verify the efficacy of the high intensity training during a suitable period of training using electronic kinetic devices in mechanically ventilated patients.”

Read Inspiratory muscle training in mechanical ventilation: suitable protocols and endpoints, the key to clear results – a critical review >

IMT: Onderzoek naar de invloed van ademspiertraining bij slokdarmkanker (IMT: Research into the effects of IMT in oesophageal cancer)

The The University Medical Center Groningen, (UMCG) will conduct a survey on the effect of a training program for the respiratory muscles in the weeks before an esophageal surgery. It is a study of the feasibility and effectiveness of two different types of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in patients with esophageal cancer who undergo surgical removal.

Read IMT: Onderzoek naar de invloed van ademspiertraining bij slokdarmkanker (IMT: Research into the effects of inspiratory muscle training in oesophageal cancer) >

Effects of Inspiratory Muscles Strengthening Among Coronary Patients on the Sleep Apnea Obstructive Syndrome

“If the value of treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) in symptomatic coronary artery disease patients appears to be established, treatment with CPAP in asymptomatic coronary artery disease patients may be too demanding. Alternative treatments are rare and results are highly variable. Therefore, it would be interesting to suggest other treatment modalities with moderate coronary and/or minimally symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.”

“This study aims to assess the relevance of inspiratory muscles strengthening on reducing Apnea Hypopnea Index in coronary artery disease patients with moderate obstructive sleep apnea (AHI between 15 and 30).

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BASES Expert Statement on Assessment and Management of Non-asthma Related Breathing Problems in Athletes

Produced on behalf of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES), Dr John Dickinson, Professor McConnell, Dr Emma Ross, Dr Peter Brown and Dr James Hull discuss the assessment and management of non-asthma related breathing problems reported by athletes, such as wheezing, tight chest, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, coughing and breathlessness.

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Sex Differences In Intensity And Qualitative Dimensions Of Exertional Dyspnea In Physically Active Young Adults

“Understanding sex differences in the qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea may provide insight into why women are more affected by this symptom than men. This study explored the evolution of the qualitative dimensions of dyspnea in 70 healthy, young, physically active adults.”

Conclusion:

“Findings suggest that men and women do not differ in their perceived quality of dyspnea during submaximal exercise, but subjective differences appear at maximal exercise and may be related, at least in part, to underlying sex differences in breathing patterns and operating lung volumes during exercise.”

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