Inspiratory Muscle Training And Respiratory Exercises In Children With Asthma

“The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and respiratory exercises have on muscle strength, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and severity variables in children with asthma.”

Conclusion:

“Programs involving IMT and respiratory exercises can increase mechanical efficiency of the respiratory muscles, as well as improving PEF and severity variables.”

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Effects Of IMT on Respiratory Function And Repetitive Sprint Performance In Wheelchair Basketball Players

“There is considerable evidence that respiratory muscle training improves pulmonary function, quality of life and exercise performance in healthy athletic populations. The benefits for wheelchair athletes are less well understood. This study examined the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon respiratory function and repetitive propulsive sprint performance in wheelchair basketball players.”

Conclusion:

“Although there was no improvement in sprint performance, participants in both the IMT and sham-IMT reported an improved respiratory muscle function and quality of life.”

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The Inspiratory Muscle Training In Elite Rowers

“The aim of the investigation was to assess the effects of the resistive inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in elite male rowers.”

Conclusion:

“The data obtained corroborate the observations that in well-trained athletes the introduction of the principle of incremental inspiratory resistance allows to improve methodically the inspiratory muscles’ strength. Once the essential period of IMT has been completed, the training volume should be reduced in order to secure the attained level of the inspiratory muscles’ strength.”

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Changes In Respiratory Muscle And Lung Function Following Marathon Running In Man

“Respiratory muscle fatigue has been reported following short bouts of high-intensity exercise, and prolonged, moderate-intensity exercise… However, links to functionally relevant outcomes such as breathing effort have been lacking. This study examined dyspnoea and leg fatigue during a treadmill marathon in nine experienced runners.”

Conclusion:

“Results confirm that prolonged moderate-intensity exercise induces inspiratory muscle fatigue. Furthermore, they suggest that the relative intensity of inspiratory muscle work during exercise makes some contribution to leg fatigue.”

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The Effect Of Inspiratory Muscle Training On High-Intensity, Intermittent Running Performance To Exhaustion

“This studied the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on maximal 20m shuttle run performance during Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test and on the physiological and perceptual responses to the running test were examined.“

Conclusion:

“Findings suggest that although both inspiratory muscle training and warm-up improve the tolerance of intense intermittent exercise, the underlying mechanisms may be different.”

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Concurrent inspiratory muscle and cardiovascular training improves both perceptions of effort and 5000-m running performance

“This study examined whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is a useful additional training aid with which to augment cardiovascular exercise training adaptations.”

Conclusion:

“The addition of IMT to a cardiovascular training programme augments 5000-m running performance but exerts no additional influence over VO2 max compared with a cardiovascular-training group. This is probably due to IMT-induced reductions in perceived effort at high ventilatory rates which is of greater consequence to longer duration time-trial performances than incremental tests of VO2 max.”

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Respiratory muscle training improves swimming endurance at depth

“Respiratory muscle training has been shown to improve divers swimming endurance at 4 feet of depth; however, its effectiveness at greater depths, where gas density and the work of breathing are substantially elevated has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of resistance respiratory muscle training on respiratory function and swimming endurance at 55 feet of depth.”

Conclusion:

“Results suggest respiratory muscle fatigue limits swimming endurance at depth as well as at the surface and resistance respiratory muscle training improves performance.”

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Development Of Respiratory Muscle Contractile Fatigue In The Course Of Hyperpnoea

“This study assessed the development of inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue during normocapnic hyperpnoea.”

Conclusion:

“During hyperpnoea, contractile fatigue of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles develops long before task failure and may trigger an increased recruitment of rib cage muscles.”

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Contribution Of Respiratory Muscle Blood Flow To Exercise-Induced Diaphragmatic Fatigue In Trained Cyclists

“This study investigated whether the greater degree of exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue previously reported in highly trained athletes in hypoxia (compared with normoxia) could have a contribution from limited respiratory muscle blood flow.”

Conclusion:

“When respiratory muscle energy requirement is not different between normoxia and hypoxia, diaphragmatic fatigue is greater in hypoxia as intercostal muscle blood flow is not increased (compared with normoxia) to compensate for the reduction in PaO2 , thus further compromising O2 supply to the respiratory muscles.”

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IMT Reduces Blood Lactate Concentration During Volitional Hyperpnoea

“Although reduced blood lactate concentrations have been observed during whole-body exercise following inspiratory muscle training (IMT), it remains unknown whether the inspiratory muscles are the source of at least part of this reduction. This investigation tested the hypothesis that IMT would attenuate the increase in blood lactate concentrations caused by mimicking, at rest, the breathing pattern observed during high-intensity exercise.”

Conclusion:

“After 6 weeks, increases in blood lactate concentrations during volitional hyperpnoea were unchanged in the control group. Conversely, following IMT the increase in blood lactate concentrations during volitional hyperpnoea was reduced by 17 ± 37% and 25 ± 34% following 8 and 10 min, respectively (P < 0.05). In conclusion, increases in blood lactate concentrations during volitional hyperpnoea at 85% maximal exercise minute ventilation were attenuated following IMT.”

“These findings suggest that the inspiratory muscles were the source of at least part of this reduction, and provide a possible explanation for some of the IMT-mediated reductions in blood lactate concentrations often observed during whole- body exercise.”

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