Effects Of IMT Upon Recovery Time During High Intensity, Repetitive Sprint Activity

“This study examined the influence of specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon recovery time during repetitive sprint activity, as well as the physiological and perceptual responses to fixed intensity shuttle running.”

Conclusion:

“Data support existing evidence that specific IMT attenuates the blood lactate and perceptual responses to submaximal endurance exercise. In addition, the present study provides new evidence that IMT improves recovery time during high intensity, intermittent exercise in repetitive sprint athletes.”

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Loading Of Trained Inspiratory Muscles Speeds Lactate Recovery Kinetics

“The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of inspiratory threshold loading and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on blood lactate concentration and acid-base balance after maximal incremental cycling.”

Conclusion:

After maximal exercise, inspiratory threshold loading affected lactate recovery kinetics only after IMT. Our data support the notion that the inspiratory muscles are capable of lactate clearance that increases strong ion difference [SID] and reduces plasma [H+]. These effects may facilitate subsequent bouts of high-intensity exercise.”

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The Effect Of IMT Upon Maximum Lactate Steady-State And Blood Lactate Concentration

“Several studies have reported that improvements in endurance performance following respiratory muscle training (RMT) are associated with a decrease in blood lactate concentration. This study examined whether pressure threshold inspiratory muscle training (IMT) elicits an increase in the cycling power output corresponding to the maximum lactate steady state.

Conclusion:

“Data supports previous observations that IMT results in a decrease in blood lactate concentration at a given intensity of exercise. That such a decrease in blood lactate concentration was not associated with a substantial (>2.5%) increase in maximum lactate steady state power is a new finding suggesting that RMT-induced increases in exercise tolerance and reductions in blood lactate concentration are not ascribable to a substantial increase in the ‘lactate threshold’.

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Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Shuttle Run Performance in Healthy Subjects

“The purpose of this study was to assess the use of computer-generated fixed-load incremental Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT) produced by the performance of repeated sustained sub-maximal inspiratory efforts with progressively reduced recovery times in healthy volunteers.”

Conclusion:

“Incremental respiratory endurance-based respiratory muscle training set at 80% of peak through range increases respiratory muscle strength, single-breath work capacity and respiratory muscle endurance and that these improvements result in reduced levels of breathlessness, an increase in predicted VO2 max and a perceived improvement in sports performance.”

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IMT Reduces Blood Lactate Concentration During Volitional Hyperpnoea

“Although reduced blood lactate concentrations have been observed during whole-body exercise following inspiratory muscle training (IMT), it remains unknown whether the inspiratory muscles are the source of at least part of this reduction. This investigation tested the hypothesis that IMT would attenuate the increase in blood lactate concentrations caused by mimicking, at rest, the breathing pattern observed during high-intensity exercise.”

Conclusion:

“After 6 weeks, increases in blood lactate concentrations during volitional hyperpnoea were unchanged in the control group. Conversely, following IMT the increase in blood lactate concentrations during volitional hyperpnoea was reduced by 17 ± 37% and 25 ± 34% following 8 and 10 min, respectively (P < 0.05). In conclusion, increases in blood lactate concentrations during volitional hyperpnoea at 85% maximal exercise minute ventilation were attenuated following IMT.”

“These findings suggest that the inspiratory muscles were the source of at least part of this reduction, and provide a possible explanation for some of the IMT-mediated reductions in blood lactate concentrations often observed during whole- body exercise.”

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Blood Lactate During Recovery From Intense Exercise: Impact Of Inspiratory Loading

“It has long been suggested that inspiratory muscle activity may impact blood lactate levels during the recovery from dynamic exercise. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inspiratory muscle activation during recovery from intense exercise would contribute to Lactate clearance, thus leading to reduced blood lactate levels.:

Conclusion:

“These data are consistent with the notion that inspiratory muscles may be net consumers of lactate during recovery from intense exercise.”

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Inspiratory Resistive Loading After All-Out Exercise Improves Subsequent Performance

Previous studies have shown that post-exercise inspiratory resistive loading reduces blood lactate. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inspiratory resistive loading during recovery could improve subsequent exercise performance.

Conclusion:

“Inspiratory resistive loading during recovery from all-out maximal-intensity exercise decreases blood lactate and perception of leg effort with beneficial effects on peak and mean power on subsequent supra-maximal exercise in healthy males. Our results provide rationale for using post-exercise inspiratory resistive loading as an ergogenic aid and future studies should be conducted to better evaluate the mechanisms responsible for this effect.”

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Pressure Threshold IMT Improves Submaximal Cycling Performance

“Improvements in submaximal endurance performance have been reported following 4 weeks of respiratory muscle training comprising isocapnic hyperpnea (Boutellier et al., 1992).  The purpose of the present study was to examine whether similar effects would be observed using resistive, flow independent loading of the inspiratory muscles.”

Conclusion:

Whilst preliminary in nature, these results indicate that resistive, flow independent inspiratory muscle training improves submaximal exercise performance in endurance trained subjects. Furthermore they add credibility to Boutellier’s assertion that, “the respiratory system is an exercise limiting factor in normal, endurance trained subjects.”

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