Effect Of Specific Inspiratory Muscle Warm-Up On Intense Intermittent Run To Exhaustion

“The effects of inspiratory muscle (IM) warm-up on the maximum dynamic IM function and the maximum repetitions of 20-m shuttle run (Ex) in the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test were examined.”

Conclusion:

“Findings suggested that the specific IM warm-up in IMW may entail reduction in breathlessness sensation, partly attributable to the enhancement of dynamic IM functions, in subsequent exhaustive intermittent run and, in turn, improve the exercise tolerance.”

Therefore POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training can effectively be used to:

  • Warm-up the breathing muscles prior to rehearsal or performance

Read Effect of specific inspiratory muscle warm-up on intense intermittent run to exhaustion >

Specific Respiratory Warm-up Improves Rowing Performance And Exertional Dyspnea

“The purpose of this study was a) to compare the effect of three different warm-up protocols upon rowing performance and perception of dyspnea, and b) to identify the functional significance of a respiratory warm-up.”

Conclusion:

“These data suggest that a combination of a respiratory warm-up protocol together with a specific rowing warm-up is more effective than a specific rowing warm-up or a submaximal warm-up alone as a preparation for rowing performance.”

Therefore POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training can effectively be used to:

  • Warm-up the breathing muscles prior to rehearsal or performance

Read Specific respiratory warm-up improves rowing performance and exertional dyspnea >

Laryngeal Movements During Inspiratory Muscle Training In Healthy Subjects

“Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been used to treat patients with exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction (VCD); the theoretical basis being the close relationship between the diaphragm and the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle, which is the main abductor of the larynx. Before launching a treatment protocol in patients with VCD, we aimed to substantiate this theory by performing laryngoscopy in healthy subjects during standardized IMT programs.”

Conclusion:

“IMT can produce laryngeal abduction in healthy subjects, and training programs may conceivably contribute positively in patients suffering from laryngeal adduction during exercise. Individual response patterns varied between subjects and individualized programs seem crucial for effect. Use of high resistances seemed to be counterproductive.”

Therefore POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training:

  • May affect the intrinsic laryngeal muscles which control the action of the larynx

Read Laryngeal movements during inspiratory muscle training in healthy subjects >

Effect of High-Intensity Inspiratory Muscle Training on Lung Volumes, Diaphragm Thickness, and Exercise Capacity in Subjects Who Are Healthy

“Previous investigations have demonstrated that a regimen of high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (IMT) resulted in changes in ventilatory function and exercise capacity in patients with chronic lung disease, although the effect of high-intensity IMT in subjects who are healthy is yet to be determined. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to examine whether high-intensity IMT resulted in changes in ventilatory function and exercise capacity in subjects who were healthy.”

Conclusion:

“The findings of this study suggest that high-intensity IMT results in increased contracted diaphragm thickness and increased lung volumes and exercise capacity in people who are healthy.”

Therefore POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training can effectively be used to:

  • Enhance the ability to inflate the lungs (take deeper breaths)

Read Effect of High-Intensity Inspiratory Muscle Training on Lung Volumes, Diaphragm Thickness, and Exercise Capacity in Subjects Who Are Healthy >

Effects Of Changes In Inspiratory Muscle Strength On The Sensation Of Respiratory Force

“The sensation of respiratory muscle force was compared in seven normal subjects before and after inspiratory muscle strength training.”

Conclusion:

“Results suggest that the sensation of respiratory muscle force reflects the proportion of the maximum force utilized in breathing and may be based on the level of respiratory motor command signals.”

Therefore POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training can effectively be used to:

  • Enhance the ability to control the breath
  • Enhance the ability to sustain forceful breathing (breathing does not become fatigued)

Read Effects of changes in inspiratory muscle strength on the sensation of respiratory force >

Benefits For Singing, Music, Dancing

The Music Tutors: POWERbreathe Week 4, after a hiatus

Unfortunately we did not keep up with our progress over the last 2 weeks because of moving back to the UK.

Laura is in Belfast now and cannot do her POWERbreathe because I have it with me. She will recommence when i next see her in a couple of weeks.  I am going to start again today.  I have just taken some more readings of how long I can sustain various notes pianissimo on an ‘i’ vowel, and the results are very similar to the most recent ones.   The figures in brackets are a reminder of the results before starting this challenge. The lowest note is the A below middle C ( I am a counter-tenor).

A           25.13s                                      ( 20s)
C             27.63s                                       (18.67s)
E              24.23s                                       (17.67s)
G              21.28s                                       (16s)
C               11.43s                                       (8s)

I am pleased to see that after 2 weeks of not doing the exercises, I have maintained what is still a marked improvement over the first results which I took before using POWERbreathe.   Recently singing in a wedding in Normandy on the way back from Sicily, after not singing in public for a while, it was noticeable to me that I could sing longer phrases in some early choral polyphony, with fewer breaths.  Let us see whether I can improve on these results over the next few days.

For more detailed results, read more at the Music Tutors