Respiratory-Related Limitations In Physically Demanding Occupations

“Respiratory muscle work limits high-intensity exercise tolerance in healthy human beings… In an occupational setting, heavy loads are routinely carried upon the trunk in the form of body armour, backpacks, and/or compressed air cylinders by military, emergency service, and mountain rescue personnel. This personal and respiratory protective equipment impairs respiratory muscle function and increases respiratory muscle work.”

Conclusion:

“An argument is presented that the unique respiratory challenges encountered in some occupational settings require further research, since these may affect the operational effectiveness and the health and safety of personnel working in physically demanding occupations.”

Read Respiratory-related limitations in physically demanding occupations >

Specific Respiratory Warm-up Improves Rowing Performance And Exertional Dyspnea

“The purpose of this study was a) to compare the effect of three different warm-up protocols upon rowing performance and perception of dyspnea, and b) to identify the functional significance of a respiratory warm-up.”

Conclusion:

“These data suggest that a combination of a respiratory warm-up protocol together with a specific rowing warm-up is more effective than a specific rowing warm-up or a submaximal warm-up alone as a preparation for rowing performance.”

Therefore POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training can effectively be used to:

  • Warm-up the breathing muscles prior to rehearsal or performance

Read Specific respiratory warm-up improves rowing performance and exertional dyspnea >

IMT Improves Lung Function And Reduces Exertional Dyspnoea In Mild/Moderate Asthmatics

“Weiner et al. (1992) have reported improvements in lung function, asthma symptoms and reductions in usage of medication following six months of pressure threshold inspiratory muscle training (IMT). Where interventions require compliance with a programme of training, it is important that patients perceive benefits rapidly if compliance is to be maintained. This study examined the changes induced by 3 weeks of IMT in mild/moderate asthmatics.”

Conclusion:

“Data are consistent with those of Weiner et al. (1992) and confirm their hypothesis that improvements in MIP and lung function translate into a reduction in exertional dyspnoea. In addition, the data suggest that where appropriate training regimens are used, these changes are observed within 3 weeks of commencement of IMT and lead to an increase in patients’ motivation to take exercise.”

Read Inspiratory muscle training improves lung function and reduces exertional dyspnoea in mild/moderate asthmatics >

Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue In Trained Cyclists: Effects Of Inspiratory Muscle Training

“This study evaluated the influence of simulated 20- and 40-km time trials upon postexercise inspiratory muscle function of trained competitive cyclists. In addition, it examined the influence of specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon the responses observed.”

Conclusion:

“Data support existing evidence that there is significant global inspiratory muscle fatigue after sustained heavy endurance exercise. Furthermore, the present study provides new evidence that performance enhancements observed after IMT are accompanied by a decrease in inspiratory muscle fatigue.”

Read Inspiratory muscle fatigue in trained cyclists: effects of inspiratory muscle training >

Effects Of IMT Upon Recovery Time During High Intensity, Repetitive Sprint Activity

“This study examined the influence of specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon recovery time during repetitive sprint activity, as well as the physiological and perceptual responses to fixed intensity shuttle running.”

Conclusion:

“Data support existing evidence that specific IMT attenuates the blood lactate and perceptual responses to submaximal endurance exercise. In addition, the present study provides new evidence that IMT improves recovery time during high intensity, intermittent exercise in repetitive sprint athletes.”

Read Effects of inspiratory muscle training upon recovery time during high intensity, repetitive sprint activity >

Inspiratory Muscle Training In Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program In COPD Patients

“Most pulmonary rehabilitation programs do not currently incorporate Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) in their pulmonary rehabilitation programs for COPD patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of adding IMT to the patients already involved in a rehabilitation program.”

Conclusion:

“IMT provides additional benefits to patients undergoing pulmonary rehabilitation program and is worthwhile even in patients who have already undergone a general exercise reconditioning (GER) program.”

Read Inspiratory muscle training in pulmonary rehabilitation program in COPD patients >

Abdominal Surgery

‘Pre-Operative IMT Preserves Postoperative Inspiratory Muscle Strength Following Major Abdominal Surgery’

“The aim of this pilot study was to assess the effect of pre-operative inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on respiratory variables in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.”

Conclusion:

“Pre-operative specific IMT improves (maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) pre-operatively and preserves it postoperatively. Further studies are required to establish if this is associated with reduced pulmonary complications.”

Read Pre-operative inspiratory muscle training preserves postoperative inspiratory muscle strength following major abdominal surgery – a randomised pilot study >

Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Exercise Tolerance in Asthmatic Individuals

“The aim of this study was to determine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle fatigue, and the perception of dyspnea in asthmatic individuals.”

Conclusion:

“This study has shown that 6 wk of IMT in individuals with mild to moderate asthma significantly increased inspiratory muscle strength, reduced inspiratory muscle fatigue, improved exercise tolerance, and reduced the perception of dyspnea during cycling exercise at È70% V ̇O2max to the limit of tolerance. These data suggest that IMT may be a helpful adjunct to asthma management and has the potential to improve participation and adherence to exercise training in this group. However, it should also be noted that the perception of breathlessness is also an important signal of bronchoconstriction, and thus, caution should be exercised if this symptom is abnormally low.”

Read Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Exercise Tolerance in Asthmatic Individuals >

Measurement Validity Of KH1 During Breathing Task In Patients With COPD

This paper studies the validity of the POWERbreathe KH1 – a recently introduced, handheld, electronic loading device. It looks at how well it provides automatically processed information on external inspiratory work, power and breathing pattern during loaded breathing tasks in patients with COPD.

Intervention: POWERbreathe KH1

Conclusion:

“The handheld device provides automatically processed and valid estimates of physical units of energy during loaded breathing tasks. This enables health care providers to quantify the load on inspiratory muscles during these tests in daily clinical practice.”

Measurement validity of an electronic inspiratory loading device during a loaded breathing task in patients with COPD >

IMT Protocol For Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (IMTCO study)

“Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been applied during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear if the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme leads to additional clinically relevant improvements in patients with COPD.

This randomised controlled trial will investigate whether the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme improves 6 min walking distance, health-related quality of life, daily physical activity and inspiratory muscle function in patients with COPD with inspiratory muscle weakness.”

Go to Inspiratory muscle training protocol for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (IMTCO study): a multicentre randomised controlled trial >