Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue In Swimmers After A Single 200m Swim

“Inspiratory muscle fatigue may occur in as little as 6 min during high-intensity spontaneously breathing exercise. The aims of this study were to determine whether inspiratory muscle fatigue occurs during swimming exercise and whether inspiratory muscle strength differs between the supine and standing body positions.”

Conclusion:

“Results indicate that a single 200m front-crawl swim corresponding to 90-95% of race pace was sufficient to induce inspiratory muscle fatigue in less than 2.7 min. Furthermore, although diaphragm muscle length is optimized when supine, our results indicate that the force output of the diaphragm and inspiratory accessory muscles is greater when upright than when supine.”

Read Inspiratory muscle fatigue in swimmers after a single 200m swim >

The Impact Of Swimming Speed On Respiratory Muscle Fatigue During Front Crawl Swimming

“The Critical velocity (Vcrit) represents a holistic swimming fatigue threshold and critical stroke rate is thought to coincide with Vcrit. Whether Vcrit, and in-turn critical stroke rate, also represent an inspiratory muscle fatigue threshold is not known.”

Conclusion:

“The study provided data demonstrating that inspiratory muscle fatigue is correlated with relative but not absolute front crawl swimming velocity, and stroke rate. Whilst this finding is obvious and to be expected, the novel aspect is that the study was able to determine the relative velocity associated with the development of inspiratory muscle fatigue. Specifically, inspiratory muscle fatigue occurred when swimming at (in some) and above (in all) Vcrit and when stroke rate was at (in some) or above (in all) 92% of critical stroke rate in both male and female adolescent swimmers.”

Read The impact of swimming speed on respiratory muscle fatigue during front crawl swimming: a role for critical velocity? >

Inspiratory Muscle Training, Altitude, and Arterial Oxygen Desaturation: A Preliminary Investigation

“Specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to significantly attenuate the fall in arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) during exhaustive exercise while breathing a hypoxic gas mixture of 14% oxygen. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of IMT on resting oxygen saturation over a range of altitudes in healthy individuals.”

Conclusion:

“IMT can attenuate the fall in resting oxygen saturation, but only at altitudes of 4880m and above. Conversely, IMT had no effect on resting levels of dyspnea as measured by the Borg Score.”

Read Inspiratory Muscle Training, Altitude, and Arterial Oxygen Desaturation: A Preliminary Investigation >

Inspiratory Muscle Warm-Up And IMT: Separate And Combined Effects On Intermittent Running To Exhaustion

“This study examined the independent and combined effects of an inspiratory muscle warm-up and inspiratory muscle training on intermittent running to exhaustion.”

Conclusion:

“Inspiratory muscle training and inspiratory muscle warm-up can both increase running distance independently, but the greatest increase is observed when they are combined.”

Read Inspiratory muscle warm-up and inspiratory muscle training: Separate and combined effects on intermittent running to exhaustion >