Lower Blood Pressure with POWERbreathe IMT

The University of Colorado Boulder is using the POWERbreathe K-Series in their independent research. They are investigating the effects of just 30 breaths of inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST). Specifically, they are looking to see if it could lower blood pressure and reduce heart attack risk. They are also investigating whether it could help you think more clearly and boost sports performance.

Lower blood pressure

One of the key findings of the research so far is that 30 breaths of IMST (about five minutes) will lower blood pressure. Crucially, with about half the tests completed, researchers report significant drops in blood pressure and improvements in large-artery function. In fact, their findings show that about 5-minutes of IMST lowers blood pressure as much as aerobic exercise and more than some medications.

Other preliminary findings

The research findings also suggest that just 5-minutes of IMST may also boost cognitive function. Furthermore, their findings show that it may also improve fitness and increase sports performance. In fact, these improvements are already proven in previous research studies. However, this study reiterates such findings.

With the help of the university’s new National Institute on Ageing grant, researchers are launching a clinical trial.

The research

Research subjects will either be a part of a sham group (using low/no IMST) or the IMST group. The IMST group will perform 30 breaths of inspiratory muscle strength training (taking approximately 5-minutes). IMST is strength training for the muscles you use to inhale. Both groups will be performing their version of IMST over a period of 6 weeks. Researchers are hoping that by doing this for 5 minutes a day in the comfort of their own home, people will get health benefits they otherwise might not get.

The tests

Researchers will be performing tests to evaluate:

  • Vascular function – how healthy the blood vessels are
  • Cerebral vascular function – how healthy the blood vessels in the brain are
  • Cognitive function
  • Physical performance – VO2 max testing assesses this
  • Motor function

Results so far are showing that the IMST group, compared to sham subjects, are lowering their blood pressure and improving blood vessel health. Also, the IMST group is performing better on certain cognitive and memory tests. In addition, the IMST group are able to keep their heart rate and oxygen consumption lower during exercise. Consequently, subjects are also showing an increase in exercise tolerance time too.

Positive outcomes

With all this evidence, researchers hope that by using IMST, people may be able to get their blood pressure under control, decrease their risk of chronic conditions and live healthier lives.

S-Index assessment improves inspiratory muscle performance

S-Index stands for Strength-Index. It is one of the POWERbreathe K-Series’ test modes. Its purpose is to calculate inspiratory muscle strength based upon peak inspiratory flow.

Peak Inspiratory Flow (PIF)

We can evaluate improvements in inspiratory muscle strength by monitoring changes in a person’s peak inspiratory flow.

Peak Inspiratory Flow is a measure which reflects the ability of the inspiratory muscles (the muscles we use to breathe in) to contract rapidly and overcome the inherent resistance and elastance of the respiratory system.

Another of the K-Series’ test modes is the measurement of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). In fact, MIP is the most common measure in use for gauging inspiratory muscle strength. It is used as a diagnostic tool and an independent predictor of all-cause mortality.

Purpose of study

Currently, the most common test for assessing inspiratory muscle performance is the maximum ‘quasi-static’ inspiratory pressure (PImax).

However, the K-Series’ S-Index test has since become available for ‘dynamically’ evaluating the maximum inspiratory pressure.

In fact, it is suggested that the S-Index might be more appropriate for measuring inspiratory muscle performance than PImax.

Therefore, this study investigates this premise. It also assesses its reliability and whether an inspiratory muscle warm-up effects strength—index assessment.

Measurement validity of the K-Series

There are, in fact, current studies that have independently verified the measurement validity of the K-Series. Consequently, findings from these previous studies demonstrate its accuracy to measure dynamic inspiratory muscle pressure 1,2.

Therefore, this study feels that a proper assessment and the reliability of the S-Index should be addressed. In particular, it investigates the variability in response to repeated measurements. Furthermore, it evaluates whether an inspiratory muscle warm-up effects strength-index assessment. It is investigating whether using strength-index assessment improves clinical outcomes by reducing the bias effect.

Reliable values of the S-Index

What this study demonstrates is that at least 8 inspiratory manoeuvres are necessary to reach maximum and reliable values of the S-Index. Moreover, it also shows that specific inspiratory muscle warm-up could improve inspiratory muscle performance.

The authors believe this to be the first study to evaluate S-Index reliability in healthy subjects. Furthermore, they believe it to be the first study to investigate the effect of inspiratory warm-up in strength-index assessment.

In conclusion, inspiratory muscle warm-up should be used for detecting the true maximum values of the S-Index to evaluate the performance of inspiratory muscles for any intervention.

Assessment of Maximum Dynamic Inspiratory Pressure >

References

  1. Measurement validity of an electronic inspiratory loading device during a loaded breathing task in patients with COPD
  2. Repeated-Sprint Cycling Does Not Induce Respiratory Muscle Fatigue in Active Adults: Measurements from The POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Trainer 

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

‘Breathing Training Improves Sleep And Cardiovascular Health In Obstructive Sleep Apnea’

“Unfortunately, the gold-standard of treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), has discouraging compliance rates. Here, we report on inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) as a potential new treatment for OSA.”

Conclusion:

“Results support inspiratory muscle strength training as a treatment that can improve the cardiovascular and sleep quality parameters in individuals with mild-moderate OSA.”

Read Breathing training improves sleep and cardiovascular health in Obstructive Sleep Apnea >

IMT Protocol For Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (IMTCO study)

“Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been applied during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear if the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme leads to additional clinically relevant improvements in patients with COPD.

This randomised controlled trial will investigate whether the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme improves 6 min walking distance, health-related quality of life, daily physical activity and inspiratory muscle function in patients with COPD with inspiratory muscle weakness.”

Go to Inspiratory muscle training protocol for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (IMTCO study): a multicentre randomised controlled trial >

IMT In Mechanical Ventilation: Suitable Protocols And Endpoints, The Key To Clear Results – A Critical Review

“Forty percent of the overall time spent in the ICU was reported to be devoted to weaning of MV. The major cause of weaning failure is the imbalance between the imposed load on the respiratory system and its capacity to overcome that.”

Conclusion:

“Inspiratory Muscle Training on mechanically ventilated patients seems to be a promissory treatment despite controversial results. Randomised Controlled Trials should be carried out to verify the efficacy of the high intensity training during a suitable period of training using electronic kinetic devices in mechanically ventilated patients.”

Read Inspiratory muscle training in mechanical ventilation: suitable protocols and endpoints, the key to clear results – a critical review >