Alterations In Maximal Inspiratory Mouth Pressure During A 400m Maximum Effort Front-Crawl Swimming Trial

“The aim of this study was to examine the changes of maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) during a 400-m front crawl swimming trial.”

Conclusion:

“Results indicated that during a maximum effort of 400-m front crawl, the reduction of inspiratory muscle strength occurs after 300-m. This should be considered for competitive swimming training by implementing swim race distance-specific respiratory muscle training.”

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Influence Of Different Breathing Frequencies On Severity Of Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue Induced By High-Intensity Front Crawl Swimming

“The aim of this study was to assess the influence of two different breathing frequencies on the magnitude of inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity front crawl swimming.”

Conclusion:

“Data suggested that there is significant global inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity swimming. Inspiratory muscle fatigue is, however, greater when breathing frequency is reduced during high-intensity front crawl swimming. Respiratory muscle training should be used to improve respiratory muscle strength and endurance in swimmers.”

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The Impact Of Swimming Speed On Respiratory Muscle Fatigue During Front Crawl Swimming

“The Critical velocity (Vcrit) represents a holistic swimming fatigue threshold and critical stroke rate is thought to coincide with Vcrit. Whether Vcrit, and in-turn critical stroke rate, also represent an inspiratory muscle fatigue threshold is not known.”

Conclusion:

“The study provided data demonstrating that inspiratory muscle fatigue is correlated with relative but not absolute front crawl swimming velocity, and stroke rate. Whilst this finding is obvious and to be expected, the novel aspect is that the study was able to determine the relative velocity associated with the development of inspiratory muscle fatigue. Specifically, inspiratory muscle fatigue occurred when swimming at (in some) and above (in all) Vcrit and when stroke rate was at (in some) or above (in all) 92% of critical stroke rate in both male and female adolescent swimmers.”

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Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue Affects Broadest Muscle in the Back During Front Crawl

A paper was published online in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research that revealed how “the presence of inspiratory muscle fatigue affects the activity of the latissimus dorsi during front crawl sprinting.”

Research:

Inspiratory muscle fatigue affects latissimus dorsi but not pectoralis major activity during arms only front crawl sprinting
Lomax M, Tasker L, Bostanci O.

Purpose of the study:

“To determine whether inspiratory muscle fatigue affects the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during maximal arms only front crawl swimming.”

Findings:

“…the presence of inspiratory muscle fatigue affects the activity of the latissimus dorsi during front crawl sprinting.”

Read the Abstract on PubMed.