IMT Improves Lung Function And Reduces Exertional Dyspnoea In Mild/Moderate Asthmatics

“Weiner et al. (1992) have reported improvements in lung function, asthma symptoms and reductions in usage of medication following six months of pressure threshold inspiratory muscle training (IMT). Where interventions require compliance with a programme of training, it is important that patients perceive benefits rapidly if compliance is to be maintained. This study examined the changes induced by 3 weeks of IMT in mild/moderate asthmatics.”

Conclusion:

“Data are consistent with those of Weiner et al. (1992) and confirm their hypothesis that improvements in MIP and lung function translate into a reduction in exertional dyspnoea. In addition, the data suggest that where appropriate training regimens are used, these changes are observed within 3 weeks of commencement of IMT and lead to an increase in patients’ motivation to take exercise.”

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Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue In Trained Cyclists: Effects Of Inspiratory Muscle Training

“This study evaluated the influence of simulated 20- and 40-km time trials upon postexercise inspiratory muscle function of trained competitive cyclists. In addition, it examined the influence of specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon the responses observed.”

Conclusion:

“Data support existing evidence that there is significant global inspiratory muscle fatigue after sustained heavy endurance exercise. Furthermore, the present study provides new evidence that performance enhancements observed after IMT are accompanied by a decrease in inspiratory muscle fatigue.”

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Effects Of IMT Upon Recovery Time During High Intensity, Repetitive Sprint Activity

“This study examined the influence of specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon recovery time during repetitive sprint activity, as well as the physiological and perceptual responses to fixed intensity shuttle running.”

Conclusion:

“Data support existing evidence that specific IMT attenuates the blood lactate and perceptual responses to submaximal endurance exercise. In addition, the present study provides new evidence that IMT improves recovery time during high intensity, intermittent exercise in repetitive sprint athletes.”

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Attenuated Inspiratory Muscle Metaboreflex In Endurance-Trained Individuals

“The inspiratory metaboreflex is activated during loaded breathing to task failure and induces sympathetic activation and peripheral vasoconstriction that may limit exercise performance. Inspiratory muscle training appears to attenuate the inspiratory metaboreflex in healthy subjects. Since whole body aerobic exercise training improves breathing endurance and inspiratory muscle strength, we hypothesized that endurance-trained individuals would demonstrate a blunted inspiratory muscle metaboreflex in comparison to sedentary individuals.”

Conclusion:

“Data demonstrate that endurance-trained individuals have an attenuated inspiratory muscle metaboreflex.”

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IMT Abolishes Blood Lactate Increase Associated With Volitional Hyperpnoea Superimposed On Exercise And Accelerates Lactate And Oxygen Uptake Kinetics At Onset Of Exercise

“The effects were examined of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon volitional hyperpnoea-mediated increases in blood lactate during cycling at maximal lactate steady state power, and blood lactate and oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise.”

Conclusion:

“Following the intervention, maximal inspiratory mouth pressure increased 19% in the IMT group only. Following IMT only, the increase in blood lactate during volitional hyperpnoea was abolished. In addition, the blood lactate and phase II oxygen uptake kinetics time constants at the onset of exercise and the maximal lactate steady state blood lactate were reduced. We attribute these changes to an IMT-mediated increase in the oxidative and/or lactate transport capacity of the inspiratory muscles.”

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Inspiratory Muscle Training Lowers The Oxygen Cost Of Voluntary Hyperpnea

“The purpose of this study was to determine if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) alters the oxygen cost of breathing (Vo(2RM)) during voluntary hyperpnea.”

Conclusion:

“The present study provides novel evidence that IMT reduces the O2 cost of voluntary hyperpnea in highly trained cyclists. This IMT-mediated reduction in the O2 cost of voluntary hyperpnea suggests that reducing the O2 requirements of the respiratory muscles may facilitate an increase in O2 availability to the active muscles during exercise. Thus these data may provide an insight into the possible mechanisms underpinning the previously reported improvements in whole body endurance performance following IMT.”

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400-Meter and 800-Meter Track Running Induces Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue In Trained Female Middle-Distance Runners

“Inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) may limit exercise performance. A few studies have reported that IMF occurs after short-duration swimming exercise, but whether short-duration running can induce IMF remains unclear.”

Conclusion:

“IMF occurs after short-duration running exercise. Coaches could consider prescribing inspiratory muscle training or warm-up in an effort to reduce the inevitable IMF associated with maximal effort running.”

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Respiratory Muscle Work Compromises Leg Blood Flow During Maximal Exercise

“This study hypothesized that during exercise at maximal O2 consumption (VO2max), high demand for respiratory muscle blood flow would elicit locomotor muscle vasoconstriction and compromise limb blood flow.”

Conclusion:

“Work of breathing normally incurred during maximal exercise causes vasoconstriction in locomotor muscles and compromises locomotor muscle perfusion and VO2.”

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Inspiratory Muscle Training, Altitude, and Arterial Oxygen Desaturation: A Preliminary Investigation

“Specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to significantly attenuate the fall in arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) during exhaustive exercise while breathing a hypoxic gas mixture of 14% oxygen. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of IMT on resting oxygen saturation over a range of altitudes in healthy individuals.”

Conclusion:

“IMT can attenuate the fall in resting oxygen saturation, but only at altitudes of 4880m and above. Conversely, IMT had no effect on resting levels of dyspnea as measured by the Borg Score.”

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Effects Of IMT On Exercise Responses In Normoxia And Hypoxia

“The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on exercise in hypoxia (H) and normoxia (N)”.

Conclusion:

“Data suggests that IMT significantly improves structural and functional physiologic measures in hypoxic exercise.”

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