Post-stroke exercise tolerance improves after RMT

Many conditions may develop post-stroke. There are common conditions that improve over time and with rehabilitation. These include physical conditions, cognitive impairment and how you feel emotionally.

Physical conditions post-stroke

Although everyone will experience different effects after a stroke, there are  commonalities. For instance after a stroke you may feel fatigued. And in fact it is fatigue, or lack of energy that is one of the most common effects after a stroke. This can lead to difficulty in everyday life and during rehabilitation. Fatigue is influenced by several factors, including depression, poor sleep, medication and pain. But physical symptoms too will cause fatigue. For instance limb weakness will make movement harder work. Consequently movement will require more energy and subsequently fatigue will set in. Finally this results in a reduction in exercise tolerance, the level of exertion you can achieve before you become exhausted.

Improving exercise tolerance post-stroke

The good news is that new research shows Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT) to be effective at improving exercise tolerance poststroke.

What is RMT

RMT is a technique that aims to improve the function of the respiratory muscles. It is achieved through specific exercises. These exercises increase the strength and endurance of your respiratory muscles. Your respiratory muscles are those you use for inhalation and exhalation. As exhalation is mostly passive, it’s inhalation that you can influence. You can exercise the muscles you use to inhale with Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT).

POWERbreathe IMT is beneficial post-stroke

POWERbreathe IMT is clinically proven Inspiratory Muscle Training. It is a Class 1 Medical Device. POWERbreathe IMT exercises the muscles you use to inhale, your inspiratory muscles. And scientific tests show that it increases inspiratory muscle strength, improves inspiratory stamina and reduces fatigue.

Latest research in poststroke patients

Findings from this new research are that RMT should be considered an effective method of improving respiratory function, inspiratory muscle strength, and exercise tolerance in patients poststroke.

Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Exercise Tolerance in Asthmatic Individuals

“The aim of this study was to determine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle fatigue, and the perception of dyspnea in asthmatic individuals.”

Conclusion:

“This study has shown that 6 wk of IMT in individuals with mild to moderate asthma significantly increased inspiratory muscle strength, reduced inspiratory muscle fatigue, improved exercise tolerance, and reduced the perception of dyspnea during cycling exercise at È70% V ̇O2max to the limit of tolerance. These data suggest that IMT may be a helpful adjunct to asthma management and has the potential to improve participation and adherence to exercise training in this group. However, it should also be noted that the perception of breathlessness is also an important signal of bronchoconstriction, and thus, caution should be exercised if this symptom is abnormally low.”

Read Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Exercise Tolerance in Asthmatic Individuals >

IMT Improves Exercise Tolerance in Recreational Soccer Players

“This study investigated whether the addition of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to an existing program of preseason soccer training would augment performance indices such as exercise tolerance and sports-specific performance beyond the use of preseason training alone.”

Conclusion:

“There may be benefit for soccer players to incorporate IMT to their pre-season training but the effect is not conclusive. It is likely that a greater pre-season training stimulus would be particularly meaningful for this population if fitness gains are a priority and evoke a stronger IMT response.”

Read Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Exercise Tolerance in Recreational Soccer Players Without Concomitant Gain in Soccer-Specific Fitness >

IMT Enhances Pulmonary O2 Uptake Kinetics And High-Intensity Exercise Tolerance In Humans

Fatigue of the respiratory muscles during intense exercise might compromise leg blood flow, thereby constraining oxygen uptake ( O2) and limiting exercise tolerance. This study tested the hypothesis that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) would reduce inspiratory muscle fatigue, speed O2 kinetics and enhance exercise tolerance.

Conclusion:

“Specific training of the inspiratory muscles increased baseline MIP, reduced estimated inspiratory muscle fatigue during severe and maximal-intensity exercise, and enhanced O2 dynamics and exercise tolerance…

“Pressure-threshold IMT appears to present a practical and efficacious means for modulating the O2 response to high-intensity exercise in healthy young people…”

“IMT therefore appears to have considerable potential as an adjunct to physical training for the enhancement of exercise performance.”

Read IMT enhances pulmonary O2 uptake kinetics and high-intensity exercise tolerance in humans >