Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue In Trained Cyclists: Effects Of Inspiratory Muscle Training

“This study evaluated the influence of simulated 20- and 40-km time trials upon postexercise inspiratory muscle function of trained competitive cyclists. In addition, it examined the influence of specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon the responses observed.”

Conclusion:

“Data support existing evidence that there is significant global inspiratory muscle fatigue after sustained heavy endurance exercise. Furthermore, the present study provides new evidence that performance enhancements observed after IMT are accompanied by a decrease in inspiratory muscle fatigue.”

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Effects Of IMT Upon Recovery Time During High Intensity, Repetitive Sprint Activity

“This study examined the influence of specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) upon recovery time during repetitive sprint activity, as well as the physiological and perceptual responses to fixed intensity shuttle running.”

Conclusion:

“Data support existing evidence that specific IMT attenuates the blood lactate and perceptual responses to submaximal endurance exercise. In addition, the present study provides new evidence that IMT improves recovery time during high intensity, intermittent exercise in repetitive sprint athletes.”

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Attenuated Inspiratory Muscle Metaboreflex In Endurance-Trained Individuals

“The inspiratory metaboreflex is activated during loaded breathing to task failure and induces sympathetic activation and peripheral vasoconstriction that may limit exercise performance. Inspiratory muscle training appears to attenuate the inspiratory metaboreflex in healthy subjects. Since whole body aerobic exercise training improves breathing endurance and inspiratory muscle strength, we hypothesized that endurance-trained individuals would demonstrate a blunted inspiratory muscle metaboreflex in comparison to sedentary individuals.”

Conclusion:

“Data demonstrate that endurance-trained individuals have an attenuated inspiratory muscle metaboreflex.”

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Respiratory Muscle Training in Athletes with Spinal Cord Injury

“The effect of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) on respiratory muscle (RM) function, dyspnoea and exercise performance was evaluated in spinal cord injury athletes.”

Conclusion:

“Respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) can improve respiratory muscle function, reduce the perception of dyspnoea but modifies only slightly exercise performance in spinal cord injury athletes.”

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Influence Of Different Breathing Frequencies On Severity Of Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue Induced By High-Intensity Front Crawl Swimming

“The aim of this study was to assess the influence of two different breathing frequencies on the magnitude of inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity front crawl swimming.”

Conclusion:

“Data suggested that there is significant global inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity swimming. Inspiratory muscle fatigue is, however, greater when breathing frequency is reduced during high-intensity front crawl swimming. Respiratory muscle training should be used to improve respiratory muscle strength and endurance in swimmers.”

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The Effect Of IMT Upon Maximum Lactate Steady-State And Blood Lactate Concentration

“Several studies have reported that improvements in endurance performance following respiratory muscle training (RMT) are associated with a decrease in blood lactate concentration. This study examined whether pressure threshold inspiratory muscle training (IMT) elicits an increase in the cycling power output corresponding to the maximum lactate steady state.

Conclusion:

“Data supports previous observations that IMT results in a decrease in blood lactate concentration at a given intensity of exercise. That such a decrease in blood lactate concentration was not associated with a substantial (>2.5%) increase in maximum lactate steady state power is a new finding suggesting that RMT-induced increases in exercise tolerance and reductions in blood lactate concentration are not ascribable to a substantial increase in the ‘lactate threshold’.

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Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Shuttle Run Performance in Healthy Subjects

“The purpose of this study was to assess the use of computer-generated fixed-load incremental Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT) produced by the performance of repeated sustained sub-maximal inspiratory efforts with progressively reduced recovery times in healthy volunteers.”

Conclusion:

“Incremental respiratory endurance-based respiratory muscle training set at 80% of peak through range increases respiratory muscle strength, single-breath work capacity and respiratory muscle endurance and that these improvements result in reduced levels of breathlessness, an increase in predicted VO2 max and a perceived improvement in sports performance.”

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Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Swimming Endurance In Divers

“The purpose of this study was to determine if two different respiratory muscle training (RRMT) protocols enhance respiratory function and swimming performance in divers.”

Conclusion:

“Results indicated that respiratory muscle fatigue is a limiting factor for underwater swimming performance, and that targeted respiratory muscle training (RRMT > ERMT (endurance)) improves respiratory muscle and underwater swimming performance.”

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Energy Cost Of Breathing At Depth: Effect Of Respiratory Muscle Training

“Respiratory muscle training against resistance (RRMT) increases respiratory muscle strength and endurance as well as underwater swimming endurance. We hypothesized that the latter is a result of RRMT reducing the high energy cost of breathing at depth.”

Conclusion:

“RRMT significantly reduced the energy cost of ventilation, measured as delta VO2/delta V(E) during ISEV, at a depth of 55 fsw. Whether this change was due to reduced work of breathing and/or increased efficiency of the respiratory muscles remains to be determined.”

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Respiratory muscle training improves swimming endurance at depth

“Respiratory muscle training has been shown to improve divers swimming endurance at 4 feet of depth; however, its effectiveness at greater depths, where gas density and the work of breathing are substantially elevated has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of resistance respiratory muscle training on respiratory function and swimming endurance at 55 feet of depth.”

Conclusion:

“Results suggest respiratory muscle fatigue limits swimming endurance at depth as well as at the surface and resistance respiratory muscle training improves performance.”

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