Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and IMT

Results revealed in a research paper published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning has revealed that “the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect.”

The POWERbreathe KH1 Inspiratory Muscle Training Device was used in this research that looked at acute activation of the diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid in combination with cycling.

Research Paper:

Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training 
Hellyer NJ, Folsom IA, Gaz DV, Kakuk AC, Mack J, Ver Mulm JA.
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Dec 17. [Epub ahead of print]

Nathan Hellyer, PT, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at the Mayo Clinic’s College of Medicine.

Purpose of the Study:

To determine the effect of IMT (Inspiratory Muscle Training) on respiratory muscle EMG-activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared to IMT performed alone.

Method:

“We chose to use an IMT of 40% MIP so as to minimize inspiratory muscle fatigue. MIP was measured with an electronic IMT device (POWERbreathe KH1) that could then be set at a fixed training load of 40% MIP.”

… “The Mayo Institutional Review Board approved all methods and procedures, including the use of human subjects.”

Discussion:

“Previous studies have demonstrated that IMT at 50-80% intensity of MIP results in diaphragm strength and endurance gains (4, 6, 7). The present study explored whether combining a non-fatiguing IMT intensity (40% IMT) with cycling would significantly increase respiratory muscle recruitment and activity. In agreement with our hypothesis, we observed that IMT at 40% MIP plus cycling produces significantly greater EMG activity than IMT alone. This suggests that cycling plus IMT may provide an additive training effect as compared to traditional IMT training.”

Practical Applications:

“Cyclists can therefore use IMT while cycling as an additional method to train. This might be especially useful when a cyclist is limited in workload due to recovery from a lower extremity injury and desires to maintain respiratory fitness.”

Read the Abstract for ‘Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training’ online.

Read more about incorporating POWERbreathe IMT into cycling training, or if you’re a cyclist and are already using POWERbreathe, then please leave a comment here or on the POWERbreathe Forum, Facebook or Twitter pages. You can also read more about POWERbreathe and cycling training in the Blog’s Cycling category.

You can also find out in which research POWERbreathe was selected as the inspiratory muscle training device of choice on our POWERbreathe in Research page.

POWERbreathe K5 at Crystal Palace National Sports Centre

Last week POWERbreathe visited Elite Cycling Performance Coaching, the cycling facilities at Crystal Palace National Sports Centre.

Elite Cycling’s owner Paul Mill is a former professional triathlete, semi-pro road rider and time-triallist, and his company is based in the highly regarded Crystal Palace Physiotherapy and Sports Injury Centre where Elite Cycling provide cycle training, coaching, advice and support to cyclists of all abilities.

Elite Cycling’s cycling facilities are found within the award winning Crystal Palace Physiotherapy and Sports Injury Centre and is where they carry out all their physical assessments, in-door sessions, bike fittings and other biomechanical analysis tests – and now, breathing analysis using the POWERbreathe K5 with Breathe-Link Software for MAC and PC!

Cyclists will be educated about the benefits of breathing training using POWERbreathe Plus models as well as being offered advanced monitoring and analysis of their breathing training using the POWERbreathe K5 which will now form a part of Elite Cycling’s Training Programmes.

Using the K5 cyclists will have the opportunity to perform a single breath test that will measure their inspiratory muscle strength, peak inspiratory flow rate and inhaled volume, all from just one breath. This can be used as a benchmark for improvement.

After training with their own individual POWERbreathe units, cyclists can then come back to Elite Cycling to have their Strength-Index (cmH2O), Power (Watts), Flow (L/s), Energy (Joules) and Volume (Litres) monitored and analysed for assessment.

We’d like to wish Elite Cycling all the best with their new breathing training programme, and to say that we’d be more than happy to offer any further assistance or advice that may be required.

Read more about why you should include POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training as part of your cycling training, or if you’re a cyclist and are already using POWERbreathe, then please leave a comment here or on the POWERbreathe Forum, Facebook or Twitter as we’d love to hear about how you’ve benefited from this breathing training. You can also read more about POWERbreathe and cycling training in the Blog’s Cycling category.

Could POWERbreathe prevent ‘turbo lag’ – cycling ace Sean Yates hopes so

Our POWERbreathe man, Duncan, recently visited Train Sharp, a POWERbreathe K5 Testing and Performance Centre in Tunbridge Wells.

TrainSharp is an experienced cycle coaching company, able to create bespoke cycling training plans around personal requirements.

Owner Jon Sharples is working in partnership with one of the biggest names in British cycling and former professional cyclist, Sean Yates. Working in partnership, both Jon and Sean have transformed beginners into top Cyclosport riders, helped juniors find pro team placements and good cyclists become even better cyclists.

Sean, former head directeur sportif at Team Sky, was one of the men who masterminded Bradley Wiggins’ Tour de France victory in July 2012 but is now giving his undivided coaching attention at TrainSharp.

Duncan met up with Jon and Sean to present the POWERbreathe K5 to them and demonstrate its functionality and power, and how easily it can be incorporated into a cyclists training to strengthen their breathing muscles for an improved performance.

Sean didn’t get off to the best of starts simply because he needed to practice his breathing technique, but after he’d quickly mastered this, his rhythm soon improved and his last 10 breaths were much more powerful. Imagine Duncan’s horror though when Sean then revealed that he’d had two strokes and “wears” a pacemaker! Sean doesn’t take his health for granted and with his ‘professional cyclist helmet on,’ he could understand how POWERbreathe inspiratory muscle training could help increase his breathing strength and stamina and ultimately cycling performance, but he also pointed out how the K5 could help his breathing in general, as since his two strokes he now struggles to get his heart rate up enough to keep up with his output: “turbo lag” as he humorously described it.

We hope that when Duncan returns from his travels, Jon and Sean will be able to report favourable improvements in their breathing and cycling performance.

Read more about why you should include POWERbreathe IMT as part of your cycling training, or if you’re a cyclist and are already using POWERbreathe, then please leave a comment here as we’d love to hear about how you feel you’ve benefited from this breathing training.