Preoperative IMT to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study)

“While in some surgical centers inspiratory muscle training is already used in the preoperative phase in patients undergoing esophageal resection, the added value of this intervention on the reduction of pulmonary complications has not yet been investigated in large surgical populations other than cardiac surgery in a randomized and controlled study design.

The effect of a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program on the incidence of postoperative pneumonia in patients undergoing esophageal resection will be studied in a single blind multicenter randomized controlled trial (the PREPARE study).”

Read Preoperative IMT to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial >

IMT In Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

“Respiratory muscles are known to be weakened and are a cause of reduced exercise capacity in both recipients and candidates of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in this patient population have not been comprehensively investigated so far. This study planned to investigate the effects of IMT during allo-HSCT on early transplantation-related outcomes.”

Conclusion:

“Inspiratory muscle training is a safe and effective intervention which improves respiratory muscle strength and exercise capacity and decreases depression and dyspnea in allo-HSCT recipients. These positive changes might be further enhanced by prolonging the duration of training or inclusion of more recipients with inspiratory muscle weakness.”

Read Inspiratory muscle training in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients: a randomized controlled trial >

Effects of Inspiratory Muscles Strengthening Among Coronary Patients on the Sleep Apnea Obstructive Syndrome

“If the value of treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) in symptomatic coronary artery disease patients appears to be established, treatment with CPAP in asymptomatic coronary artery disease patients may be too demanding. Alternative treatments are rare and results are highly variable. Therefore, it would be interesting to suggest other treatment modalities with moderate coronary and/or minimally symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.”

“This study aims to assess the relevance of inspiratory muscles strengthening on reducing Apnea Hypopnea Index in coronary artery disease patients with moderate obstructive sleep apnea (AHI between 15 and 30).

Go to Effects of Inspiratory Muscles Strengthening Among Coronary Patients on the Sleep Apnea Obstructive Syndrome >

Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Muscle Mechanics and Haemodynamics in Healthy Adults

“The effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) remain controversial. Many studies have examined the effect IMT has on exercise performance, but any changes to the body that come from IMT have yet to be looked at.

This study will look at how someone breathes can change after IMT. Understanding how IMT changes the body can help us use IMT in different treatments.”

Go to Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Muscle Mechanics and Haemodynamics in Healthy Adults >

 

IMT in Allo-HSC Transplantation Recipients

CLINICAL TRIAL

Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

Although meta-analysis, systematic reviews and studies have all demonstrated beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on several outcomes in different disease groups; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis and heart failure, no published paper has yet reported the effects of IMT in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients (allo-HSC) recipients. This is the purpose of this clinical trial undertaken in Turkey.

INTERVENTION:

The intervention for the treatment group receiving IMT is the POWERbreathe Classic

Read the clinical trial, Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

Check out more Inspiratory Muscle Training Research here >

Discover POWERbreathe used in Research here >

Respiratory Muscles and Inspiratory Muscle Training

Clinical trial: Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Muscle Mechanics and Haemodynamics in Healthy Adults

The purpose of this clinical trial is to study any changes to the body that come from Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT), looking at how someone breathes may change after IMT, and how this could help with using IMT in different treatments.

Sponsored by the University of British Columbia, this study is currently recruiting participants aged 19 – 39 years.

Read the clinical trial, Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Muscle Mechanics and Haemodynamics in Healthy Adults

Check out more Inspiratory Muscle Training Research here >

Discover POWERbreathe used in Research here >

Home-based Respiratory Training After Stroke

This new clinical trial, which is not yet open for participant recruitment, will test the hypothesis that home-based combined inspiratory muscular training (IMT) plus expiratory muscular training (EMT) program is effective in improving strength and endurance of the inspiratory and expiratory muscles, fatigue, exercise capacity, and quality of life (QoL) with stroke subjects.

Located at the Department of Physical Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Brazil, the starting date for this trial is July 2015, with an estimated study completion of December 2017.

OFFICIAL TITLE:

Effects of Home-based Respiratory Training After Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Rationale:

“Weakness of the respiratory muscles demonstrated by individuals with stroke, may generate important symptoms, such as fatigue and dyspnea. Since adequate strength of the inspiratory and expiratory muscles is required, mainly when performing physical activities, rehabilitation interventions for stroke subjects should include respiratory training.”

See more Inspiratory Muscle Training Research >

Effects of IMT on Breathing Pattern in Patients With COPD

The purpose of this clinical trial, sponsored by Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, is based on how improvement in inspiratory muscle function might result in beneficial changes in breathing pattern during whole body exercise. The hypothesis is the effect of inspiratory muscle training as an adjunct to a pulmonary rehabilitation program improves the breathing pattern during an incremental cycle exercise.

Read the clinical trial, Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Breathing Pattern in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Check out more Inspiratory Muscle Training Research here >

Discover POWERbreathe used in Research here >

Inspiratory Muscle Training During Pulmonary Rehabilitation in COPD

On March 04, 2014 ClinicalTrials.gov processed data on a new Clinical Trial: “Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) on Dyspnea in COPD During Pulmonary Rehabilitation: Randomized Controlled Trial

Brief Summary of the Clinical Trial

“Demonstrate that IMT associated with a conventional pulmonary rehabilitation program allows a significant improvement of dyspnea in subjects with severe or very severe COPD than a conventional pulmonary rehabilitation program alone.”

Study Primary Completion Date: August 2015

Interventions Used in this Clinical Trial

  • Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) using POWERbreathe

For more details about this Clinical Trial including Arms, Groups and Cohorts; Outcome Measures; Criteria for Participation; and other additional information about this trial, visit ClinicalTrialsFeeds.org

Find more published research on our Inspiratory Muscle Training Research blog.

Four Weeks of Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Self-Paced Walking Performance in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Journal of ObesityA new Clinical Study, published in the Journal of Obesity (Volume 2012, Article ID 918202), examined whether a programme of inspiratory muscle training (IMT), using POWERbreathe, improves accumulative distance of self-paced walking in overweight and obese adults.

Fifteen overweight and obese adults were randomised into experimental and placebo groups. Lung function, inspiratory muscle performance, 6-minute walking test, and predicted VO2 max were assessed prior to and following the 4-week IMT intervention.

Both groups performed 30 inspiratory breaths, twice daily using POWERbreathe.

They concluded the study by suggesting that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) provides a practical, minimally intrusive intervention to significantly augment both inspiratory muscle performance and walking distance covered by overweight and obese adults in a clinically relevant 6-minute walk test. This indicates that IMT may provide a useful priming (preparatory) strategy prior to entry in a physical training programme for overweight and obese adults.

Read the full text pdf of the article here