Effects of High-Intensity IMT Following a Near-Fatal Gunshot Wound

CASE STUDY

Effects of High-Intensity Inspiratory Muscle Training Following a Near-Fatal Gunshot Wound

Description:

A man who sustained a gunshot wound (via the left axilla which exited from the right side of the abdomen) during armed combat left him with severe thoracic and abdominal injuries. After five months he still reported severe dyspnoea on exertion and so a program of high-intensity, interval-based threshold inspiratory muscle training (IMT) was undertaken.

Discussion points and observations:

The subject tolerated well the high-intensity IMT. “It was associated with improvements in maximum forced inspiratory flow and changed the locus of symptom limitation during high-intensity exercise from dyspnea to leg fatigue.”

The purpose of this case study was to ensure every effort is made to optimise physical function following such injuries, so that individuals may continue in active service.

Use POWERbreathe To Help Alleviate Side Stitch

A recent article in Triathlete Europe offered advice on how to avoid side stitch, citing diaphragm spasm as one of the most common causes, with spasm of the accessory muscles of breathing, the obliques, another cause.

Canadian Running also featured an article about side stitch explaining that as you take in air (while running) your diaphragm contracts, allowing your lungs to expand, and this, like any other muscle, can become overloaded during a run, straining it and causing it to spasm.

While there appears to be no definitive consensus on the causes of side stitch, many medical and sports professionals do believe it to be associated with the diaphragm, your main breathing muscle, and surrounding muscles.

An easy way to help prevent your diaphragm from feeling fatigued is to train your inspiratory muscles (mainly your diaphragm and intercostals) with POWERbreathe to become stronger. This will help improve your breathing stamina and enable you to run or swim for longer with less effort.

A pain in the side – why a stitch can turn a sporting demigod into a ‘DNF’ is a really informative article written by Sports Performance Bulletin which looks at strategies for coping with stitch and training techniques for its prevention, including POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training.

Effects of IMT on Resistance to Fatigue of Respiratory Muscles in Exercise

EliteVelo Kalas Sportswear Cycling Race Team by Richard Fox Photography

EliteVelo Kalas Sportswear Cycling Race Team using POWERbreathe Plus IMT (above)
PHOTO: Richard Fox Photography

STUDY:

Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Resistance to Fatigue of Respiratory Muscles During Exhaustive Exercise
M. O. Segizbaeva, N. N. Timofeev, Zh. A. Donina, E. N. Kur’yanovich, N. P. Aleksandrova

This study, published in Body Metabolism and Exercise – Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Volume 840, 2015, pp 35-43) concluded that IMT elicits resistance to the development of inspiratory muscles fatigue during high-intensity exercise.

PURPOSE:

To assess the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm, parasternal, sternocleidomastoid and scalene muscles in healthy humans during exhaustive exercise.

The sternocleidomastoid muscle flexes the neck and helps with the oblique rotation of the head. Also, the muscle helps in forced inspiration while breathing, and it raises the sternum. As for forced inspiration, the muscle also works in concert with the scalene muscles in the neck. The scalene muscles are lateral vertebral muscles that begin at the first and second ribs and pass up into the sides of the neck. There are three of these muscles. (SOURCE: Healthline.com)

CONCLUSION:

“The study found that in healthy subjects, IMT results in significant increase in MIP (+18 %), a delay of inspiratory muscle fatigue during exhaustive exercise, and a significant improvement in maximal work performance. We conclude that the IMT elicits resistance to the development of inspiratory muscles fatigue during high-intensity exercise.”

Read Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Resistance to Fatigue of Respiratory Muscles During Exhaustive Exercise

Check out more Inspiratory Muscle Training Research here >

Discover POWERbreathe used in Research here >

Women Police Officers Fail Fitness Test – POWERbreathe Could Help

Nearly 3% of 13,024 police officers have failed to pass their compulsory fitness test, and of those 3% who failed, 70% of them were women (according to a news article published online at BBC News UK which looked at figures provided by 27 forces under the Freedom of Information Act.)

Compulsory police fitness testing for those involved in officer safety training was introduced only last year (2014) in England and Wales for police officers, and what could be missing from their training in preparation for the fitness test, is Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT).

Biologically women have smaller lungs and airways and weaker respiratory muscles, which makes breathing during exercise much harder work. This could be a contributing factor in fitness levels in women, and why more women than men failed the police fitness test.

The study that discovered women really do get more exhausted during exercise than men, ‘Physiological mechanisms of sex differences in exertional dyspnea: Role of neural respiratory motor drive’ revealed that “because of a woman’s smaller size, when she is exercising, her brain needs to send stronger electrical signals to the respiratory muscles, and specifically the diaphragm, than does a man’s in the same situation.”

This revelation that women are more short of breath than men during exercise because their respiratory muscles are more active does not mean that there’s no hope for women. On the contrary, all is not lost because women – in fact all of us – can influence the strength and stamina of our breathing, by exercising our breathing muscles with POWERbreathe.

By incorporating POWERbreathe respiratory muscle training into fitness training 4 – 6 weeks in advance of the police fitness test, women can start off with an advantage as opposed to feeling disadvantaged because of their physiology. By taking just 30 breaths twice a day through POWERbreathe against the adjustable resistance we can all improve our breathing strength and stamina, and for women preparing for their police fitness test, this would help their performance in the Shuttle Run Test, and ultimately during any prolonged foot chases and foot patrols.

Read more about incorporating POWERbreathe IMT into police fitness training, or if you’re a police officer and are already using POWERbreathe, then please leave a comment here or on the POWERbreathe Forum, Facebook or Twitter pages as we’d appreciate your feedback.