Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Exercise Tolerance in Asthmatic Individuals

“The aim of this study was to determine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle fatigue, and the perception of dyspnea in asthmatic individuals.”

Conclusion:

“This study has shown that 6 wk of IMT in individuals with mild to moderate asthma significantly increased inspiratory muscle strength, reduced inspiratory muscle fatigue, improved exercise tolerance, and reduced the perception of dyspnea during cycling exercise at È70% V ̇O2max to the limit of tolerance. These data suggest that IMT may be a helpful adjunct to asthma management and has the potential to improve participation and adherence to exercise training in this group. However, it should also be noted that the perception of breathlessness is also an important signal of bronchoconstriction, and thus, caution should be exercised if this symptom is abnormally low.”

Read Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Exercise Tolerance in Asthmatic Individuals >

Type 2 Diabetes

‘Inspiratory Muscle Training In Type 2 Diabetes With Inspiratory Muscle Weakness’

“Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus may present weakness of the inspiratory muscles. This study tested the hypothesis that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) could improve inspiratory muscle strength, pulmonary function, functional capacity, and autonomic modulation in patients with type 2 diabetes and weakness of the inspiratory muscles.”

Conclusion:

“Patients with type 2 diabetes may frequently present inspiratory muscle weakness. In these patients, IMT improves inspiratory muscle function with no consequences in functional capacity or autonomic modulation.”

Read Inspiratory muscle training in type 2 diabetes with inspiratory muscle weakness >

Lung Cancer Surgery

‘Respiratory Muscle Strength, Functional Capacity and Subjective Outcome – Effects of IMT After Lung Cancer Surgery’

“The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of postoperative inspiratory muscle training on the recovery of respiratory muscle strength in high risk patients referred for lung cancer surgery. Furthermore, to assess longitudinal changes in respiratory muscle strength, physical capacity and health-related quality of life after lung cancer surgery.”

Go to Respiratory Muscle Strength, Functional Capacity and Subjective Outcome – Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training After Lung Cancer Surgery, a Randomized Controlled Trial >

Measurement Validity Of KH1 During Breathing Task In Patients With COPD

This paper studies the validity of the POWERbreathe KH1 – a recently introduced, handheld, electronic loading device. It looks at how well it provides automatically processed information on external inspiratory work, power and breathing pattern during loaded breathing tasks in patients with COPD.

Intervention: POWERbreathe KH1

Conclusion:

“The handheld device provides automatically processed and valid estimates of physical units of energy during loaded breathing tasks. This enables health care providers to quantify the load on inspiratory muscles during these tests in daily clinical practice.”

Measurement validity of an electronic inspiratory loading device during a loaded breathing task in patients with COPD >

Acute Effects Of Different Inspiratory Resistive Loading On Heart Rate Variability In Healthy Elderly Patients

“The cardiovascular system is noticeably affected by respiration. However, whether different inspiratory resistive loading intensities can influence autonomic heart rate (HR) modulation remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate HR modulation at three different inspiratory resistive loading intensities in healthy elderly men.”

Conclusion:

“Results suggest that lower inspiratory efforts produce higher heart rate variability. These findings represent important clinical applications because low respiratory muscle training intensities can produce greater parasympathetic heart rate modulation in this population. Thus, we should choose the most appropriate load for achieving the most beneficial autonomic effects, which are associated with reduced cardiovascular event and morbidity incidence.”

Read Acute effects of different inspiratory resistive loading on heart rate variability in healthy elderly patients >

IMT Protocol For Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (IMTCO study)

“Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been applied during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear if the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme leads to additional clinically relevant improvements in patients with COPD.

This randomised controlled trial will investigate whether the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme improves 6 min walking distance, health-related quality of life, daily physical activity and inspiratory muscle function in patients with COPD with inspiratory muscle weakness.”

Go to Inspiratory muscle training protocol for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (IMTCO study): a multicentre randomised controlled trial >

Comparing Inspiratory Resistive Muscle Training with Incentive Spirometry on Rehabilitation of COPD Patients

“The purpose of this randomised controlled trial was to examine the effect of incentive spirometry in pulmonary rehabilitation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and compare its efficacy with inspiratory resistive muscle training (IMT) technique.”

Conclusion:

“Both techniques improved the mean values of all respiratory function tests (p≤.01). The IMT technique was more effective to improve MVV and PImax (p≤.05). PEFR was better improved in the incentive spirometry group (p≤.05). There was no significant difference for other spirometric parameters between two groups. Incentive spirometry can be considered as an effective component for pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD patients.”

Read Comparing Inspiratory Resistive Muscle Training with Incentive Spirometry on Rehabilitation of COPD Patients >

Effects of IMT on Dyspnea in COPD During Pulmonary Rehabilitation: Randomized Controlled Trial

The purpose of this trial is to demonstrate that Inspiratory Muscle Training associated with a conventional pulmonary rehabilitation program allows a significant improvement of dyspnea in subjects with severe or very severe COPD than a conventional pulmonary rehabilitation program alone.”

Go to Effects of IMT on Dyspnea in COPD During Pulmonary Rehabilitation: Randomized Controlled Trial >

Preoperative IMT to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study)

“While in some surgical centers inspiratory muscle training is already used in the preoperative phase in patients undergoing esophageal resection, the added value of this intervention on the reduction of pulmonary complications has not yet been investigated in large surgical populations other than cardiac surgery in a randomized and controlled study design.

The effect of a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program on the incidence of postoperative pneumonia in patients undergoing esophageal resection will be studied in a single blind multicenter randomized controlled trial (the PREPARE study).”

Read Preoperative IMT to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial >

A New Device For IMT In Patients With Tracheostomy Tube In ICU: A Randomized Trial

The objective of this randomised controlled trial was to compare the inspiratory muscle strength between two groups of tracheostomy patients: Inspiratory Muscle Training with POWERbreathe and breathing through a humidified t-piece (T-tune).

Conclusion:

“The Inspiratory Muscle Training with POWERbreathe in tracheostomy patients promotes increased muscle strength.”

Read A new device for inspiratory muscle training in patients with tracheostomy tube in ICU: A randomized trial >