Take To Your Healthcare Professional

POWERbreathe Medic Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) is available for prescription on the NHS for patients with medical conditions such as COPD, Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease.

The POWERbreathe Medic offers an evidence-based, drug-free treatment for patients with medical conditions where dyspnoea (breathlessness) is present. It is the only Inspiratory Muscle Training device available for prescription that has been used in research into the benefits of IMT for a variety of medical conditions and prescribed by medical professionals as either a standalone intervention or as part of a rehabilitation programme.

This Information For Healthcare Professionals leaflet is available to download should you wish to take it along to your clinic appointment. It provides a brief overview for the healthcare professional about:

  • How POWERbreathe works
  • IMT in COPD
  • IMT in asthma
  • IMT in chronic heart failure
  • IMT in other medical conditions; Contraindications
  • All references

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POWERbreathe Medic helps patients with breathing problems AND saves NHS money and resources

Health bosses announced back in October 2014 that the NHS in England needed extra money and an overhaul to services in order for patient care not to suffer.

When it comes to respiratory care the NHS could save both money and resources if they prescribed POWERbreathe Medic Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT) for patients with medical conditions such as COPD, Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease.

In a 2005 study of the benefits of a 12-month programme of POWERbreathe RMT, researchers observed significant reductions in the use of healthcare resources.1

POWERbreathe RMT for COPD

Accordingly to Professor Peter Calverley (Lung Report III. British Lung Foundation), in the average PCT serving 250,000 people, there would be 14,200 GP consultations per year for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 9,600 inpatient bed days. Reducing length of hospital stay is an NHS productivity indicator.

POWERbreathe reduced hospital bed days by 29% and GP consultations by 23% compared with placebo (see table above).

POWERbreathe RMT for Asthma

In another study, Weiner et al2 observed an 86% reduction in hospitalisations/emergency room visits following respiratory muscle training in moderate/severe asthmatics (from 1.4 to 0.2 per 3 months per patient).

And in three separate studies, Weiner et al. observed an average 51% reduction in β2-agonist consumption (from 3.9 to 1.6 puffs per day)2,3,4 after respiratory muscle training, and in one study3, corticosteroid use decreased ~80%.

How POWERbreathe Medic could save NHS money & resources

In 2005 when this study was conducted, the total potential annual savings derived from POWERbreathe Medic prescription per average PCT due to reduced hospital bed days and medication consumption (not including savings due to reduction in GP consultations) were substantial.

The POWERbreathe Medic offers an evidence-based, drug-free treatment for patients with medical conditions such as COPD, Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease. It is the only Inspiratory Muscle Training device for RMT available for prescription that has been used in research into the benefits of IMT for a variety of medical conditions and prescribed by medical professionals as either a standalone intervention or as part of a rehabilitation programme.

For respiratory care professionals there is a POWERbreathe Medic Try-Before-You-Prescribe demonstration kit; an educational tool designed to help healthcare professionals and patients understand and experience the effect POWERbreathe Medic has on the respiratory muscles.

Since the approval of the POWERbreathe Medic for prescription in 2006, POWERbreathe has introduced the revolutionary, electronic POWERbreathe KH1, intended for use by healthcare professionals for respiratory muscle training and assessment in patients with dyspnoea, including patients with asthma, COPD, bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, Parkinson’s disease and spinal injury.

The POWERbreathe KH1 is also suitable for use with disposable TrySafe filters and can be used bedside, on the ward, as part of a pulmonary program, or for single patient use at home under medical supervision.

Launched after the POWERbreathe Medic, following the latest technological advances in research and design, is the next generation POWERbreathe Medic: the POWERbreathe Medic Plus for patients to use at home, straight out of the box, with improved airflow dynamics and a more comfortable user experience. And for healthcare professionals (and their patients), is the new POWERbreathe KH2 with Breathe-Link Medic Live Feedback Software.

References:

  1. Beckerman M, Magadle R, Weiner M, Weiner P. The effects of 1 year of specific inspiratory muscle training in patients with COPD. Chest. 2005 Nov;128(5):3177-82.
  2. Weiner P, Azgad Y, Ganam R, Weiner M. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with bronchial asthma. Chest. 1992;102(5):1357-61.
  3. Weiner P, Berar-Yanay N, Davidovich A, Magadle R, Weiner M. Specific inspiratory muscle training in patients with mild asthma with high consumption of inhaled beta(2)-agonists. Chest. 2000;117(3):722-7.
  4. Weiner P, Magadle R, Massarwa F, Beckerman M, Berar-Yanay N. Influence of gender and inspiratory muscle training on the perception of dyspnea in patients with asthma. Chest. 2002;122(1):197-201.

Do you breathe in quickly and expel slowly or other way around?

You should breathe in quickly and forcefully through the POWERbreathe (enabling you to ‘lift’ the weight/resistance), and then breathe out naturally as you would normally. Do this 30 times, twice a day. When you feel it getting easier, and you can easily manage the 30 breaths without reaching the point of failure, then increase the resistance a quarter turn. This will be your new training load.