Pilates Plus IMT Improves Lung Function

Researchers from Brazil are looking at the effects of combining Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) with Pilates on lung function in elderly women. The reason for this is because ageing affects the respiratory system. In fact, it can change the composition of the lung’s connective tissue.

Ageing and the lungs

Ageing will ultimately affect bones and muscles. Moreover, natural ageing also affects the bones and muscles of the chest. Consequently, it may affect the shape of the ribcage. As a result, the ribcage may no longer expand or contract as well as it once did, during breathing. Additionally, the main breathing muscle, the diaphragm, becomes weaker too. This will affect how much air a person is able to breathe in and out.

Furthermore, ageing affects lung tissue and the airways may lose their ability to stay open. Additionally, the air sacs begin to lose their shape. Consequently, air may become trapped in the lungs. This affects how well you’re able to breathe.

Why inspiratory muscle training?

Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) is a form of resistance training that exercises the inspiratory muscles. The main inspiratory muscles are the diaphragm and intercostals. It’s these muscles that are responsible for drawing air into the lungs. Furthermore, it’s these muscles that will be affected by ageing. Therefore, exercising these muscles with IMT will limit the effects of ageing. IMT will help them to become stronger and less prone to fatigue.

The IMT device that participants use in this trial is the POWERbreathe K5.

Participants breathe in through the K5 for 30 breaths. They perform this twice, with a one-minute interval between each set. After two weeks’ training, they must increase the training resistance by 10%. Researchers then assess an individual’s results following Pilates exercise.

Why Pilates?

Pilates is an exercise programme, developed in the 20th Century by Joseph Pilates. The exercises focus on improving core strength and muscular imbalance. Furthermore, Pilates improves flexibility, overall muscle strength and is low-impact, making it ideal for the age group in this study.

As we age, we become less active and more sedentary. Consequently, sitting for long periods limits movement and affects the body. In fact, age affects the entire musculoskeletal system: joints, muscles and bones. As a result, posture is affected and we also start to lose muscle tone, balance and joint mobility. Pilates can help to minimise these age-related changes.

For this study, participants use the Cadillac, Combo Chair and Reformer devices for the Pilates method. The researchers recommend nine exercises per session. Participants perform up to three sets of 12 repetitions of each exercise. They do this for a maximum of 45-minutes.

Study results

To establish if IMT positively effects breathing muscle strength, each participant’s maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is measured. MIP is an index of diaphragm strength and an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (longevity). Study findings show that MIP significantly evolved in the elderly. Additionally, the study highlights:

“the use of the POWERbreathe K5 device, which further favoured the gain in this variable.”

Findings also show:

“that all the variables were significantly better in the intervention groups than in the Control Group, thus strengthening the importance of the association between IMT and Pilates.”

In conclusion

“In conclusion, physiotherapy is an excellent ally in the prevention, promotion, and maintenance of health, quality of life and functional capacity in the gerontological population. The use of the Pilates Studio method, associated with technological equipment that allows more detailed analysis and treatment of pulmonary conditions, strength, function and mobility, was shown to be beneficial for this type of application.”

The influence of inspiratory muscle training combined with the Pilates method on lung function in elderly women: A randomized controlled trial >

Metaboreflex & Performance in Elite Female Soccer

ECSS is the European College of Sport Science (ECSS). Part of its purpose is to promote junior scientists and foster state-of-the-art research. And in order to do this, ECSS have created the Young Investigators Award (YIA). This award-winning research, presented in the video, is for Metaboreflex and Performance in Elite Female Soccer: Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training.

Video presentation of ECSS YIA winning research

Metaboreflex & Performance in Elite Female Soccer

This research aims to determine the effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) on respiratory and peripheral muscles oxygenation. It examines this during a maximal exercise tolerance test and on repeated-sprint ability (RSA) performance in professional women football players.

Inspiratory Muscle Training

All participants in the study perform 6-weeks of IMT. The device they use for IMT is the POWERbreathe K5 with Breathe-Link Live Feedback software.

At the end of their 6 weeks’ training, all participants are reevaluated.

Research Findings

The findings show that,

“…only the IMT group present lower deoxyhaemoglobin and total haemoglobin blood concentrations on intercostal muscles concomitantly to an increased oxyhemoglobin and total haemoglobin blood concentrations on vastus lateralis muscle during time-to-exhaustion”

Research Conclusions

Results suggest the potential role of IMT to attenuate inspiratory muscles metaboreflex. Consequently, oxygen and blood supply to limb muscles during high-intensity exercise improves. Furthermore, there is also a potential impact on inspiratory muscle strength, exercise tolerance and sprints performance in professional women football players.

ECSS YIA Award

ECSS presents scientists with the opportunity of entering this prestigious competition for scientific excellence, every year. And it’s at the ECSS annual congress where young scientists present their scientific work, as they compete to win the YIA Award.

Following presentations, members of the ECSS Scientific Board and ECSS Scientific Committee, grant the awards. They base this decision upon an oral and mini-oral presentation for the top ten presentations respectively.

Bruno Archiza is the winner of this 2016 YIA award, and his presentation took place at the 21st annual congress of the ECSS in Vienna.

Tennis Players’ Endurance Improves after POWERbreathe IMT

New research shows tennis players’ endurance and strength improves after Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT). The research from Pune, India, is in the International Journal of Current Research (February 2018).

What affects tennis performance

The main characteristics of this game are intense bouts of running, such as sprinting to reach a ball. Consequently, breathing is driven to its highest levels. And this induces extreme breathlessness. This affects performance.

In order to continue to play effectively while maintaining a high level of skill performance, breathing mustn’t hinder performance.

Breathing effort in tennis

Playing tennis involves using your breathing muscles in your torso to brace and twist during a racket stroke. Also, experienced players use their inflated lungs to brace the impact of the ball and racket. This helps them to control the release of air from their lungs and optimise the transmission of force. However, breathing muscle fatigue impairs this control. Thankfully though, breathing muscle strengthening training will improve this. Using a device that specifically trains the breathing muscles, the inspiratory muscles, is the easiest way of doing this. These are called Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) devices, such as POWERbreathe IMT. And training your breathing muscles to become stronger can help with a player’s postural control and movement too.

Research into players’ endurance

The research from Pune highlights the fact that tennis matches feature high-intensity, short- duration bouts of extreme activity with a short rest time. And it’s the competition of blood flow between the arms and legs and the breathing muscles which ultimately increases breathing fatigue.

For this study, researchers use the POWERbreathe KH1 Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) device to strengthen participants’ breathing muscles. Furthermore, each participant performed a prescribed protocol for using the device for five days over four weeks. Researchers were aiming to assess the effect of IMT on cardiovascular endurance in lawn tennis players.

Research findings

The findings of this latest research show there to be,

“significant improvement in cardiovascular endurance and strength in lawn tennis players after progressive inspiratory muscle training.”

How to improve tennis performance

POWERbreathe IMT specifically targets the breathing muscles, strengthening them by around 30-50%, significantly improving performance and helping to eliminate breathing fatigue. And these findings are a result of studies with tennis players who, after IMT, took less time to recover and were ready sprint maximally again more quickly.

 

 

Hospitalised Patients Benefit from POWERbreathe IMT

A new clinical trial in Brazil has found that POWERbreathe IMT improves inspiratory muscle strength and shortens the length of stay in hospitalised patients.

Objective

The aim of this double-blind randomised controlled trial is to assess the impact of IMT on hospitalised patients. IMT stands for Inspiratory Muscle Training. It trains the inspiratory muscles (the ones we use to breathe in) to become stronger and more resistant to fatigue. IMT is undertaken using the POWERbreathe Plus IMT device.

Proposed Outcomes for Hospitalised Patients

Hospitalised patients, with no existing respiratory issues, may encounter inpatient complications.

The clinical trial believes that, if implemented early, POWERbreathe IMT could prevent in-hospital adverse outcomes. These may, or may not, be directly associated with the loss of respiratory muscle mass inherent to a prolonged hospital stay.

Trial Method

Subjects are randomly assigned to either an IMT intervention group or an IMT sham group. Both groups were also to undergo conventional physiotherapy interventions.

The IMT intervention group performs IMT using the POWERbreathe Plus. Each patient trains against a load equivalent to 50% of their maximum inspiratory pressure. Maximum inspiratory pressure, or MIP, is a marker of respiratory muscle function and strength. All they need to do is breathe in through the device for 30 breaths. And they do this twice a day for 4 weeks.

Trial Results

Results show that patients in the IMT intervention group had a significantly shorter length of stay in hospital. They also show a lower risk of endotracheal intubation, muscle weakness and mortality.

Findings

The trial’s findings demonstrate that POWERbreathe IMT is a safe addition to physiotherapy. Results also show that it improves inspiratory muscle strength and functional status, as well as a shortened length of hospital stay.

Conclusion

This clinical trial shows that early implementation of POWERbreathe IMT is effective at preventing complications due to prolonged hospitalisation. It is also effective at reducing associated in-hospital mortality rates. Its therapeutic use is safe and well-tolerated in the hospital environment, providing respiratory gain and improving functional capacity.

Full details of this clinical trial are freely available for all to read on the internet. Safety and efficacy of inspiratory muscle training for preventing adverse outcomes in patients at risk of prolonged hospitalisation.

Post-stroke exercise tolerance improves after RMT

Many conditions may develop post-stroke. There are common conditions that improve over time and with rehabilitation. These include physical conditions, cognitive impairment and how you feel emotionally.

Physical conditions post-stroke

Although everyone will experience different effects after a stroke, there are  commonalities. For instance after a stroke you may feel fatigued. And in fact it is fatigue, or lack of energy that is one of the most common effects after a stroke. This can lead to difficulty in everyday life and during rehabilitation. Fatigue is influenced by several factors, including depression, poor sleep, medication and pain. But physical symptoms too will cause fatigue. For instance limb weakness will make movement harder work. Consequently movement will require more energy and subsequently fatigue will set in. Finally this results in a reduction in exercise tolerance, the level of exertion you can achieve before you become exhausted.

Improving exercise tolerance post-stroke

The good news is that new research shows Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT) to be effective at improving exercise tolerance poststroke.

What is RMT

RMT is a technique that aims to improve the function of the respiratory muscles. It is achieved through specific exercises. These exercises increase the strength and endurance of your respiratory muscles. Your respiratory muscles are those you use for inhalation and exhalation. As exhalation is mostly passive, it’s inhalation that you can influence. You can exercise the muscles you use to inhale with Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT).

POWERbreathe IMT is beneficial post-stroke

POWERbreathe IMT is clinically proven Inspiratory Muscle Training. It is a Class 1 Medical Device. POWERbreathe IMT exercises the muscles you use to inhale, your inspiratory muscles. And scientific tests show that it increases inspiratory muscle strength, improves inspiratory stamina and reduces fatigue.

Latest research in poststroke patients

Findings from this new research are that RMT should be considered an effective method of improving respiratory function, inspiratory muscle strength, and exercise tolerance in patients poststroke.

Effectiveness Of RMT Along With Aerobic Training In Community Dwelling Elderly Individuals

“Ageing is associated with decline in performance of various systems resulting in reduced exercise capacity, fatigue and reduced respiratory muscle functioning. Studies reported that respiratory muscle training is effective to increase respiratory muscle functioning in various populations but the reports are limited in community dwelling elderly population.” Intervention: POWERbreathe Conclusion “Respiratory muscle training along with aerobic training was more effective than aerobic training alone in improving respiratory muscle function, fatigue and exercise capacity in community dwelling elderly individuals after four weeks of intervention.” Effectiveness of respiratory muscle training along with aerobic training in community dwelling elderly individuals >

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POWERbreathe Medic helps patients with breathing problems AND saves NHS money and resources

Health bosses announced back in October 2014 that the NHS in England needed extra money and an overhaul to services in order for patient care not to suffer.

When it comes to respiratory care the NHS could save both money and resources if they prescribed POWERbreathe Medic Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT) for patients with medical conditions such as COPD, Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease.

In a 2005 study of the benefits of a 12-month programme of POWERbreathe RMT, researchers observed significant reductions in the use of healthcare resources.1

POWERbreathe RMT for COPD

Accordingly to Professor Peter Calverley (Lung Report III. British Lung Foundation), in the average PCT serving 250,000 people, there would be 14,200 GP consultations per year for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 9,600 inpatient bed days. Reducing length of hospital stay is an NHS productivity indicator.

POWERbreathe reduced hospital bed days by 29% and GP consultations by 23% compared with placebo (see table above).

POWERbreathe RMT for Asthma

In another study, Weiner et al2 observed an 86% reduction in hospitalisations/emergency room visits following respiratory muscle training in moderate/severe asthmatics (from 1.4 to 0.2 per 3 months per patient).

And in three separate studies, Weiner et al. observed an average 51% reduction in β2-agonist consumption (from 3.9 to 1.6 puffs per day)2,3,4 after respiratory muscle training, and in one study3, corticosteroid use decreased ~80%.

How POWERbreathe Medic could save NHS money & resources

In 2005 when this study was conducted, the total potential annual savings derived from POWERbreathe Medic prescription per average PCT due to reduced hospital bed days and medication consumption (not including savings due to reduction in GP consultations) were substantial.

The POWERbreathe Medic offers an evidence-based, drug-free treatment for patients with medical conditions such as COPD, Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease. It is the only Inspiratory Muscle Training device for RMT available for prescription that has been used in research into the benefits of IMT for a variety of medical conditions and prescribed by medical professionals as either a standalone intervention or as part of a rehabilitation programme.

For respiratory care professionals there is a POWERbreathe Medic Try-Before-You-Prescribe demonstration kit; an educational tool designed to help healthcare professionals and patients understand and experience the effect POWERbreathe Medic has on the respiratory muscles.

Since the approval of the POWERbreathe Medic for prescription in 2006, POWERbreathe has introduced the revolutionary, electronic POWERbreathe KH1, intended for use by healthcare professionals for respiratory muscle training and assessment in patients with dyspnoea, including patients with asthma, COPD, bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, Parkinson’s disease and spinal injury.

The POWERbreathe KH1 is also suitable for use with disposable TrySafe filters and can be used bedside, on the ward, as part of a pulmonary program, or for single patient use at home under medical supervision.

Launched after the POWERbreathe Medic, following the latest technological advances in research and design, is the next generation POWERbreathe Medic: the POWERbreathe Medic Plus for patients to use at home, straight out of the box, with improved airflow dynamics and a more comfortable user experience. And for healthcare professionals (and their patients), is the new POWERbreathe KH2 with Breathe-Link Medic Live Feedback Software.

References:

  1. Beckerman M, Magadle R, Weiner M, Weiner P. The effects of 1 year of specific inspiratory muscle training in patients with COPD. Chest. 2005 Nov;128(5):3177-82.
  2. Weiner P, Azgad Y, Ganam R, Weiner M. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with bronchial asthma. Chest. 1992;102(5):1357-61.
  3. Weiner P, Berar-Yanay N, Davidovich A, Magadle R, Weiner M. Specific inspiratory muscle training in patients with mild asthma with high consumption of inhaled beta(2)-agonists. Chest. 2000;117(3):722-7.
  4. Weiner P, Magadle R, Massarwa F, Beckerman M, Berar-Yanay N. Influence of gender and inspiratory muscle training on the perception of dyspnea in patients with asthma. Chest. 2002;122(1):197-201.

Reliability of K-Series for Assessing Pulmonary Function in Post-Stroke Patients

STUDY:

Reliability of an Electronic Inspiratory Loading Device for Assessing Pulmonary Function in Post-Stroke Patients

Kyeong-Bong Lee, Min-Kyu Kim, Ju-Ri Jeong, Wan-Hee Lee

This recently published clinical research undertaken at the Graduate School of Physical Therapy, Sahmyook University, Seoul, Republic of Korea, was to examine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of an electronic inspiratory loading device for the assessment of pulmonary functions: maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity.

Maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity for pulmonary functions were assessed using an electronic inspiratory loading device – the POWERbreathe K5 with Breathe-Link Live Feedback software.

Conclusions:

After assessment the researchers concluded, “The intra- and inter-examiner reliability of the pulmonary function measurements, maximum inspiratory pressure, peak inspiratory flow, and vital capacity, for the post-stroke patients was very high. The results suggest that the electronic inspiratory loading device would be useful for clinical rehabilitative assessment of pulmonary function.”

Read the full research paper, Reliability of an Electronic Inspiratory Loading Device for Assessing Pulmonary Function in Post-Stroke Patients

Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: Review and New Hypotheses

COMMENTARY

Failed back surgery syndrome: review and new hypotheses
Bruno Bordoni, Fabiola Marelli

Dove Medical Press published this Open Access Full Text Article from the Journal of Pain Research about Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS), asking if diaphragm dysfunction plays a bigger part in persistent chronic lower back pain than previously thought.

The commentary says that the dysfunction of the diaphragm muscle is not even considered when trying to understand the causes that lead to FBSS i.e. texts in literature do not mention the subject.

In conclusion:

The commentary concludes saying “the diaphragm itself could be a source of pain, due to the change of its proprioceptors or irritation of the phrenic nerve and the vagus nerve. If scientific research were to prove that the diaphragm muscle plays an important role in FBSS, the therapeutic approach might provide an additional step toward improving the clinical condition and quality of life in this patient population.”

Read the full Commentary in pdf here >

Respiratory Muscle Training and Cognitive Function Exercising at Altitude

STUDY:

Respiratory Muscle Training and Cognitive Function Exercising at Altitude
Quackenbush J, Duquin A, Helfer S, Pendergast DR.

This study, published in Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance (AMHP), formerly Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, examined the effects that voluntary isocapnic hyperventilatory training of the respiratory muscles (VIHT) has on selected measures of executive functioning, including working memory and processing speed at simulated altitude up to 12,000 ft.

Conclusion:
The study concluded VIHT improved processing speed and working memory during exercise at altitude.

Read the full article here >