Relating to COPD – a report that looks into living with COPD

The World Health Organization (WHO) predicts COPD will be the third leading cause of death in 2030. In fact, the chief causes of death globally has shifted. Whereas the main cause of death used to be from infectious diseases, it is now from noncommunicable diseases. Diseases with chronic conditions, such as COPD.

Living with COPD

COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) is a group of lung conditions that cause airflow blockage and result in breathing-related problems. It includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. The narrowing of the airways makes it harder for people with COPD to breathe in and out. And it’s these breathing difficulties that can affect many aspects of daily life. It can reduce quality of life.

There are many people living with the disease that know how to manage their condition. However, there are millions of others who are living with undiagnosed symptoms of COPD.

Statistics

The UK is 12th on the list of the top 20 countries for COPD mortality in the world. However, rates are higher in New Zealand and the United States. These statistics for COPD are part of the Respiratory Health of the Nation project, for The British Lung Foundation.

Relating to COPD

This report, however, Relating to COPD, takes an alternative look into those living with COPD. It has been compiled from the viewpoint of those with experience of COPD. So, in fact, it looks into the physical and emotional effects of COPD. An online forum inspired the idea. The study looked at keywords and phrases to understand how living with COPD makes people feel, and how deeply it can impact their daily lives.

How COPD Affects Breathing

One of the most common questions asked by people with COPD is how it affects breathing. To understand this, it’s first worth understanding how your lungs work.

How your lungs work

As you breathe in, you bring air down through your windpipe and into your airways. Your airways then branch out in your lungs into thinner tubes, called bronchioles. And at the end of your bronchioles are small air sacs.

Running along the walls of your air sacs are small blood vessels, or capillaries. When the air you breathe in reaches your air sacs, the oxygen passes through the air sac wall and into the blood in the capillaries. As this is happening the waste product carbon dioxide (CO2) moves from the capillaries and into the air sacs. This process is called gas exchange; bringing vital oxygen in to the body while removing the waste CO2.

How COPD affects breathing

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is a group of lung conditions used to describe progressive lung diseases. These include emphysema, chronic bronchitis, non-reversible asthma, and some forms of bronchiectasis. All conditions cause breathing difficulties. If you have COPD you’ll know how difficult it is to empty air out of your lungs. This is because your airways have narrowed.

In a person without COPD, their healthy airways and air sacs are stretchy. After filling with air they will bounce back after being emptied. This elasticity helps to move air quickly in and out of the lungs.

However in a person with COPD, their airways and air sacs are no longer stretchy. They no longer bounce back. They also become swollen, thicker, and produce more mucus, making it harder to get air out of the lungs. This is what causes the symptoms of wheezing, chesty cough and breathlessness.

How COPD is treated

Unfortunately damage caused by COPD is permanent. However there are treatments that can help to stop it from progressing. Symptoms can also be managed. So with prevention the key to living with COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation is a hugely beneficial treatment.

Treatments include medication, inhalers and pulmonary rehab, including breathing exercises. Part of a Pulmonary Rehab Toolkit (Lung Foundation Australia) is Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT), such as POWERbreathe. In fact there are many clinical studies showing the benefits of IMT for COPD. One such study concluded,

“…during IMT in patients with significant COPD, there is an increase in exercise capacity, improvement in quality of life, and decrease in dyspnea. The study also provides evidence that long-term IMT can decrease the use of health services and hospitalization days.”

Pulmonary Rehabilitation Toolkit
Pulmonary Rehabilitation Toolkit

Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT)

A clinical study, published in the official journal of the American College of Chest Physicians, assessed The Effects of 1 Year of Specific Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients With COPD.

Using POWERbreathe IMT it found improvements in patients with COPD, of:

  • Inspiratory muscle strength of 55%
  • Endurance of 86%
  • Quality of life by 21%
  • Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured breathing) by 36%

 

Phlegm in lungs – clear naturally with drug-free Shaker

You will usually find phlegm in the back of the throat or in the lungs. It is produced by the lower airways. Mucus on the other hand will normally be found in the mucous membranes inside the nose. It acts like a filter protecting your lungs as you inhale. To clear it you simply blow your nose. Phlegm however is thicker and more viscous. You usually only notice it when you cough it up. An excess of this secretion can be a symptom of a respiratory problem such as bronchitis.

Why you should cough up phlegm

Although unpleasant, you can safely swallow mucus. This is because your body can safely reabsorb it. Phlegm however must be expelled from the body. Advice from healthcare professionals is to cough it up. This is because it will contain virus and dead bacteria. As you cough it up you are helping your body to get rid of the infection.

What to do when phlegm is problematic

Secretions will be more of a problem at night. This is simply because of gravity. These secretions will feel heavy in your chest. This can bring on coughing. You can allieviate this by elevating your sleeping position. Simply prop yourself up more with a pillow. Coughing is actually your body’s natural way of expelling the phlegm. This will help you to get better.

Expel phlegm with drugs – or drug-free

Expectorants can be prescribed to help increase bronchial secretion. They are intended to help make it easier to cough it up. But expectorants are medicines. Shaker by POWERbreathe however is an effective drug-free alternative.

Expel phlegm naturally with the Shaker

The Shaker by POWERbreathe literally ‘shakes’ secretions in your chest to make them more mobile. The shaking breaks these secretions down and makes it easier for you to cough it up.

How the Shaker works

Inside the Shaker device is a weighted ball. As you breathe in through the device the ball rises and then falls again under its own weight. This happens quickly and feels like vibrations. This vibration and gentle resistance dislodges and thins phlegm. You’re then more able to expel it by coughing.

Who can use the Shaker

Because the Shaker is drug-free and easy-to-use, children and adults can use it. And because it shakes up phlegm, it is ideal for people with respiratory problems. These include Chronic Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis, Emphysema, Asthma and Cystic Fibrosis. There are however some precautions which you will find on the Shaker Classic, Shaker Deluxe and Shaker Plus product pages.

A Modified Breathing Exercise Program For Asthma Is Easy To Perform And Effective

Published online (June 2016) is this new study in the Journal of Asthma, A modified breathing exercise program for asthma is easy to perform and effective. The study evaluated a simple, modified breathing exercise program investigating how easy it was to perform and how effective it was as an adjunctive therapy. The program incorporated three different breathing exercises (yoga pranayama techniques, diaphragmatic breathing and pursed lip breathing), each of which was taught to the 74 subjects. Conclusion: “A simple program of breathing exercises was found to be effective and could be completed in less than 10 minutes per day. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant improvement in Asthma Control Test (ACT) scores post-exercise.” One of the exercises, diaphragmatic breathing, can be performed easily in the home without tuition by using POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training devices. (Please check with your healthcare provider first.) The scientifically proven training regimen is just 30 breaths twice a day which takes about 5 minutes. POWERbreathe exercises the muscles used to breathe in, primarily the diaphragm and intercostal muscles. It uses the principles of resistance training to exercise these inspiratory muscles by making you breathe in through the device against an adjustable variable ‘load’. It’s like ‘dumbbells for your diaphragm’, and the more you use it the stronger your breathing muscles become; the stronger they become the more you increase the load, improving your ability to take a deeper, more satisfying breath. This training not only makes your breathing muscles stronger but it also improves their stamina and reduces fatigue, improving quality of life in those with breathing problems such as asthma and COPD, and improving performance in those who’re physically active.

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POWERbreathe Medic helps patients with breathing problems AND saves NHS money and resources

Health bosses announced back in October 2014 that the NHS in England needed extra money and an overhaul to services in order for patient care not to suffer.

When it comes to respiratory care the NHS could save both money and resources if they prescribed POWERbreathe Medic Respiratory Muscle Training (RMT) for patients with medical conditions such as COPD, Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease.

In a 2005 study of the benefits of a 12-month programme of POWERbreathe RMT, researchers observed significant reductions in the use of healthcare resources.1

POWERbreathe RMT for COPD

Accordingly to Professor Peter Calverley (Lung Report III. British Lung Foundation), in the average PCT serving 250,000 people, there would be 14,200 GP consultations per year for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 9,600 inpatient bed days. Reducing length of hospital stay is an NHS productivity indicator.

POWERbreathe reduced hospital bed days by 29% and GP consultations by 23% compared with placebo (see table above).

POWERbreathe RMT for Asthma

In another study, Weiner et al2 observed an 86% reduction in hospitalisations/emergency room visits following respiratory muscle training in moderate/severe asthmatics (from 1.4 to 0.2 per 3 months per patient).

And in three separate studies, Weiner et al. observed an average 51% reduction in β2-agonist consumption (from 3.9 to 1.6 puffs per day)2,3,4 after respiratory muscle training, and in one study3, corticosteroid use decreased ~80%.

How POWERbreathe Medic could save NHS money & resources

In 2005 when this study was conducted, the total potential annual savings derived from POWERbreathe Medic prescription per average PCT due to reduced hospital bed days and medication consumption (not including savings due to reduction in GP consultations) were substantial.

The POWERbreathe Medic offers an evidence-based, drug-free treatment for patients with medical conditions such as COPD, Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease. It is the only Inspiratory Muscle Training device for RMT available for prescription that has been used in research into the benefits of IMT for a variety of medical conditions and prescribed by medical professionals as either a standalone intervention or as part of a rehabilitation programme.

For respiratory care professionals there is a POWERbreathe Medic Try-Before-You-Prescribe demonstration kit; an educational tool designed to help healthcare professionals and patients understand and experience the effect POWERbreathe Medic has on the respiratory muscles.

Since the approval of the POWERbreathe Medic for prescription in 2006, POWERbreathe has introduced the revolutionary, electronic POWERbreathe KH1, intended for use by healthcare professionals for respiratory muscle training and assessment in patients with dyspnoea, including patients with asthma, COPD, bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, Parkinson’s disease and spinal injury.

The POWERbreathe KH1 is also suitable for use with disposable TrySafe filters and can be used bedside, on the ward, as part of a pulmonary program, or for single patient use at home under medical supervision.

Launched after the POWERbreathe Medic, following the latest technological advances in research and design, is the next generation POWERbreathe Medic: the POWERbreathe Medic Plus for patients to use at home, straight out of the box, with improved airflow dynamics and a more comfortable user experience. And for healthcare professionals (and their patients), is the new POWERbreathe KH2 with Breathe-Link Medic Live Feedback Software.

References:

  1. Beckerman M, Magadle R, Weiner M, Weiner P. The effects of 1 year of specific inspiratory muscle training in patients with COPD. Chest. 2005 Nov;128(5):3177-82.
  2. Weiner P, Azgad Y, Ganam R, Weiner M. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with bronchial asthma. Chest. 1992;102(5):1357-61.
  3. Weiner P, Berar-Yanay N, Davidovich A, Magadle R, Weiner M. Specific inspiratory muscle training in patients with mild asthma with high consumption of inhaled beta(2)-agonists. Chest. 2000;117(3):722-7.
  4. Weiner P, Magadle R, Massarwa F, Beckerman M, Berar-Yanay N. Influence of gender and inspiratory muscle training on the perception of dyspnea in patients with asthma. Chest. 2002;122(1):197-201.

Effects of IMT and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD

STUDY:

Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD With and Without Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

Published in Respiratory Care (Nov 10 2015), the aim of this study was to “compare the effects of inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises associated with physical training in subjects with COPD as an additional benefit of strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, thoracoabdominal mobility, physical exercise capacity, and reduction in dyspnea on exertion.”

CONCLUSIONS:

Both the inspiratory muscle training group and the calisthenics-and-breathing exercises group increased their exercise capacity and decreased dyspnea during physical effort.

Inspiratory muscle training however was more effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength and endurance which could result in a decreased sensation of dyspnea. Also, subjects with respiratory muscle weakness who performed inspiratory muscle training showed higher gains in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance but not of dyspnea and submaximal exercise capacity.

 

POWERbreathe on World COPD Day 2015

The aim of World COPD Day is to improve awareness and care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) around the world.

COPD is a chronic inflammatory lung disease which causes obstructed airflow from the lungs and is a collective name for a variety of lung diseases, such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive airways disease.

Shortness of breath and difficult, laboured breathing – otherwise known as dyspnoea – is a common feature of COPD and patients diagnosed with COPD will have weak inspiratory muscles.

A one-year study of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in patients with COPD was conducted in 2005 using POWERbreathe and was shown to ellicit:

  • Improvements in inspiratory muscle strength of 55% in patients with COPD
  • Improvements in endurance of 86% in patients with COPD
  • Improvements in quality of life by 21% in patients with COPD
  • Improvements in dyspnoea by 36% in patients with COPD

There have been many studies that have demonstrated the efficacy of IMT for patients with COPD, with one published only this September/October (2015) that looked into the effect of home-based inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, exertional dyspnea and pulmonary function in COPD patients. It concluded that short-term IMT has beneficial effects on exercise capacity and exertional dyspnea in COPD patients.

Effects of IMT on Breathing Pattern in Patients With COPD

The purpose of this clinical trial, sponsored by Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, is based on how improvement in inspiratory muscle function might result in beneficial changes in breathing pattern during whole body exercise. The hypothesis is the effect of inspiratory muscle training as an adjunct to a pulmonary rehabilitation program improves the breathing pattern during an incremental cycle exercise.

Read the clinical trial, Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Breathing Pattern in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Check out more Inspiratory Muscle Training Research here >

Discover POWERbreathe used in Research here >

It’s World COPD Day and POWERbreathe’s here to help!

World COPD Day is an annual event organised by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) to improve awareness and care of COPD around the world. You can stay up-to-date with World COPD Day news as well as connecting with others via their WORLD COPD Facebook page.

COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) damages the airways to the lungs and makes it harder for a person with COPD to get air in and out of their lungs, which results in difficulty breathing.

Dyspnoea (difficult, laboured breathing or shortness of breath) is a common feature of COPD and many other disorders, and those diagnosed with COPD will have weak inspiratory muscles (the muscles used to breathe in).

In the study, ‘The Effects of 1 Year of Specific Inspiratory Muscle Training in Patients with COPD‘ published online in CHEST (the official publication of the American College of Chest Physicians) POWERbreathe Inspiratory Muscle Training was shown to elicit:

  • Improvements in inspiratory muscle strength of 55% in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  • Improvements in endurance of 86% in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  • Improvements in quality of life by 21% in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  • Improvements in dyspnoea by 36% in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

The POWERbreathe Medic is an inspiratory muscle training device (IMT), or respiratory muscle training device (RMT), which is available for prescription in the UK and offers an evidence-based, drug-free treatment for patients with COPD as well as for those with a variety of other medical conditions such as Heart Failure, Asthma, Thoracic Surgery, Ventilator Weaning, Cystic Fibrosis and Neuromuscular Disease.

Prescribed by medical professionals, the hand-held POWERbreathe Medic breathing muscle training device is being prescribed as a standalone intervention or as part of a rehabilitation programme and has no side-effects or drug interactions. Always speak to a medical professional about your medical issues or concerns. Please consult your health care provider before beginning any health related program.

Read more about POWERbreathe for COPD and how the POWERbreathe K-Series has been recognised as the ‘Gold Standard’ RMT (Respiratory Muscle Training) device for important research, and which concluded “that the handheld device provides automatically processed and valid estimates of physical units of energy during loaded breathing tasks. This enables health care providers to quantify the load on inspiratory muscles during these tests in daily clinical practice.”

Expiratory + IMT Improves Respiratory Muscle Strength in Subjects With COPD

Published in Respiratory Care: September 1, 2014 vol. 59 no. 9 1381-1388

STUDY

Expiratory and Expiratory Plus Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Respiratory Muscle Strength in Subjects With COPD: Systematic Review

Leonardo F Neves, Manoela H Reis, Rodrigo DM Plentz, Darlan L Matte, Christian C Coronel, Graciele Sbruzzi

Abstract

“Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) produces beneficial effects in COPD subjects, but the effects of expiratory muscle training (EMT) and EMT plus IMT in ventilatory training are still unclear. The aim of this study was to systematically review the effects of EMT and EMT plus IMT compared to control groups of COPD subjects.”

Methods

“This study is a systematic review and meta-analysis. The search strategy included MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, PEDro, and Cochrane CENTRAL and also manual search of references in published studies on the subject.”

Conclusion

“EMT and EMT plus IMT improve respiratory muscle strength and can be used as part of the treatment during pulmonary rehabilitation of subjects with severe to very severe COPD.”

View the Abstract here

View list of published research that used POWERbreathe as the IMT intervention of choice in POWERbreathe in Research.

Find more published research on our Inspiratory Muscle Training Research blog.