Respiratory Physiotherapy using the Shaker by POWERbreathe

If you have a disease that results in sputum production, your physiotherapist will prescribe respiratory physiotherapy for you. Initially, this will involve the physio assessing you to identify the problem. As a result, management techniques and a treatment plan will be put in place. This will include airway clearance techniques, such as oscillating PEP. Different types of mucus clearance device use oscillating PEP, including the Shaker by POWERbreathe. Such devices combine the techniques of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) with oscillations. Your physio will refer to these as ‘oscillatory positive expiratory pressure’, or OPEP devices.

Respiratory Physiotherapy using the Shaker by POWERbreathe, by BreatheWellPhysio
Respiratory Physiotherapy using the Shaker by POWERbreathe, courtesy of Breathe Well Physio.

Shaker mucus clearance devices

The Shaker device will help to shift your bronchial secretions by combining PEP and oscillations. This combination will help you to expectorate the increasing amount of mucus you’re producing. By coughing out more mucus, you’re helping to prevent infections of your respiratory tract. It is also helpful if you have hay fever, which can make symptoms of asthma, such as coughing and wheezing, feel worse. Devices like the Shaker are easy-to-use without medical supervision, so you may decide to use it as an alternative, or additional, treatment to your prescribed medical respiratory physiotherapy.

Although it works similarly to the older Acapella mucus clearance device, research reveals the Shaker to have better linearity at higher airflows. The same research also finds the pressure amplitude produced by the Shaker and Flutter mucus clearance device to be greater at low and high pressures. Finally, the same study shows a higher frequency of oscillation for the Shaker and Flutter at an intermediate pressure. This is all beneficial in helping you get the most from your therapy.

The Shaker Classic, Shaker Deluxe and Shaker Medic Plus by POWERbreathe all mobilise mucus using oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (OPEP). An important point to note is that the Shaker devices are all gravity-dependent, as opposed to gravity-independent. This is worth bearing in mind as a 2018 study finds,

“the gravity-dependent devices were the ones to display close mechanical performances and produce optimal operational parameters at the simulated exhalation settings.”

https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/52/suppl_62/OA5191

By contrast, this same study finds that the two gravity-independent OPEP devices, the Acapella Choice and Aerobika, “probably require higher expiratory pressure to reach theoretical therapeutic effectiveness.”

Therapeutic effects of the Shaker

If you have a condition such as chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis or asthma, then you’ll be only too aware of the excessive amount of mucus you produce. You may also notice a change in the type of mucus you’re producing. Because of this, it’s no surprise that you’ll be having difficulty clearing the mucus, even after coughing. But this is where using the Shaker by POWERbreathe for respiratory physiotherapy can help you.

The Shaker uses a stainless-steel ball, weighing 30g, to help clear bronchial secretions. It does this by ‘shaking’ and causing a vibration, or percussion, in your chest. This happens as you exhale through the mouthpiece. As you breathe out through the device, the 30g steel ball provides a resistance. This causes the ball to move and shake and makes it more difficult for you to breathe out. All this shaking and vibration loosens the mucus. After breathing out through it a few times, you’ll find you’ll need to huff, or cough, to expel the mucus. You can see this being demonstrated in the video above. After a few uses, you’ll begin to work out for yourself how long and how frequently you’ll need to use your Shaker device, as everyone is different.

To further enhance the therapeutic effect of your Shaker airway clearance device, its mouthpiece is designed to allow you to use it in a sitting or lying position.

Respiratory physiotherapy techniques

In respiratory physiotherapy, no one technique fits all. A therapist must take into consideration the strength of their patient, the thickness of their mucus and where it is located. However, as a patient, the price may be a criterion for selecting the most suitable device. In this 2013 study, assessment of the Flutter, Acapella and Shaker shows all three mechanical behaviours to be reliable. However, the Shaker is likely to be the most cost-effective.

This type of respiratory physiotherapy aims to help you clear excessive phlegm, sputum, mucus and catarrh. Consequently, breathing effort reduces and exercise tolerance improves, helping you return to a better quality of life.

Young children benefit from respiratory physiotherapy too, but they will require something with a lighter resistance to exhale against. If you have children, you’ll know that you’ll also need to make their therapy more fun. Blowing games using the Flowball by POWERbreathe can help them to clear secretions.

Precautions

You should always consult a doctor before starting any treatment if you’re concerned about any medical issue.

Smokers lungs work better after POWERbreathe IMT

This new study investigates the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on smokers and non-smokers. Researchers from Ondokuz Mayıs University and Gaziantep University in Turkey look into how IMT may affect pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in both these groups.

Pulmonary function & respiratory muscle strength

Pulmonary function indicates how well a person’s lungs are working to help them breathe. There are different tests that measure pulmonary function, otherwise known as lung function.

Respiratory muscle strength is an indication of how much pressure the breathing muscles generate when a person breathes in or out. Assessment of respiratory muscle strength involves measuring MIP or MEP. MIP or maximal inspiratory pressure reflects the strength of the inspiratory muscles, such as the diaphragm. Meanwhile MEP or maximal expiratory pressure reflects the strength of the expiratory muscles.

The IMT program

For the IMT program, subjects use the POWERbreathe Classic IMT device. The procedure consists of 30 x 2 dynamic inspiratory efforts with a 1-minute interval. They perform this for four weeks, seven days a week. The reason researchers chose this procedure is that it has been previously applied in healthy individuals.

Smokers group, non-smokers & placebo groups

Forty-two healthy males enrol in this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental design study. There are 16 subjects in the IMT smokers group (IMTS), 16 in the IMT non-smokers group (IMTN) with the final 10 subjects in the placebo group. This final group receive a sham ‘placebo’ treatment that will have no real effect.

By using a double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental design study, researchers can test out a therapy. The placebo treatment will feel just like the actual treatment, in this case, IMT. The reason for this is so that both the subject and the researcher’s expectations will not affect the outcome. Furthermore, a double-blind controlled study means that neither the researchers nor the subjects taking part know who will be receiving which treatment. This is vital in helping to avoid bias when measuring outcomes.

For the study, the experimental groups (IMTS and IMTN) perform POWERbreathe IMT at 50% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Researchers increase this each week. Meanwhile, in the placebo group, subjects perform POWERbreathe IMT at only 15% of MIP.

Improvements occur in smokers after IMT

Results of the study show significant improvements in respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary functions after the 4-week POWERbreathe IMT program. Even more promising is the fact that improvements in smokers are greater. Potentially, this is a result of a:

“greater influence of exercise on smokers’ lung microbiome in reversing the negative effects of smoking.”

For smokers, this means that their stronger inspiratory muscles will improve their ability to breathe in more air, for longer and with less fatigue. This will have a positive impact on daily life by helping them improve their ability to perform daily activities that may have been prohibitive before.

Natural Remedy for Hay Fever Cough

Hay fever may make symptoms of asthma, such as coughing and wheezing, feel worse. In fact, people with respiratory symptoms may experience continuous coughing as a result of their hay fever. This is likely to be due to the type of allergens affecting them. However, if a cough becomes unusually persistent, it is always best to report it to a doctor. But for those with asthma already taking medication, finding a natural remedy for hay fever induced coughing is of interest.

Natural Remedy for Hay Fever Induced Coughing

Coughing is the body’s natural way of trying to clear the lungs of fluid or mucus. Mucus production increases as a result of respiratory infections, such as a cold or the flu. However, mucus also increases when a person has an allergic reaction. In the case of hay fever, this will be to a type of pollen. It’s this allergic reaction that can cause persistent coughing, as the body tries to shift mucus, or phlegm, from the lungs.

Phlegm is produced by the respiratory system. When there is a large amount of phlegm, it can clog the airways. When phlegm is present in large amounts, the body naturally coughs to expel it. This resulting cough from clogging of the airways is particularly distressing in people with asthma.

Antihistamines and decongestants are traditionally taken to help relieve symptoms of allergies and hay fever. However, neither will get rid of phlegm on the chest. Furthermore, both are drugs. Additionally, an expectorant will help to make mucus thinner so it is easier to cough up, but that too is made from a type of drug.

People with asthma know how important it is to ensure that any additional medication they take is safe to use with their prescribed asthma treatment. It is helpful, therefore, to find a drug-free cough treatment that will help with mucus clearance. A drug-free cough treatment, by its nature, will have no drug interactions.

How to Clear Mucus

A natural remedy for hay fever cough is to use a mucus clearance device. The Shaker offers chesty cough relief by shaking loose the phlegm on the chest.

The weighted ball inside the Shaker rises as the user breathes out through the device. It then falls under its own weight. However, it does this so quickly that it feels like a vibration. It’s this vibrating action that mobilises lung secretions, breaking them down and making them thinner and less sticky. This makes it easier for the user to then expel the phlegm. A productive cough will result after using the Shaker; sometimes immediately and sometimes it may be an hour later. But the productive cough that the Shaker induces will help the user to eliminate the mucus. Ultimately, this brings much relief from chest congestion.

Shaker devices are ideal for ‘shaking’ loose mucus and catarrh that is associated with:

  • Chronic Bronchitis
  • Bronchiectasis
  • Emphysema
  • Asthma
  • Cystic Fibrosis

Shaker devices are also suitable for children to use, under parental guidance, as they are easy-to-use and effective. Please always speak to a medical professional first about medical issues or concerns and also read the precautions before using.

How to Keep Your Lungs Healthy

If you are finding breathing difficult because you have a lung condition, the European Lung Foundation believes exercise is helpful. In fact, you can discover how exercise helps to keep your lungs healthy in one of our previous blogs, How To Keep Your Lungs Healthy With Exercise. Additionally, by eating a healthy diet you can also help to keep your lungs healthy. If you find this topic to be of interest, then you may like to read another one of our blogs, Foods for Keeping your Lungs Healthy.

Can Multiple Sclerosis Affect Breathing

The automatic nervous system is part of the central nervous system. It controls vital functions, one of which is breathing, which we do without thinking. According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, it is unusual for MS to affect the nervous system and therefore breathing.

How Multiple Sclerosis affects breathing

However, patients with MS will experience muscle weakness. This affects all parts of the body, including the breathing muscles. These muscles, mainly the diaphragm and intercostals begin to lose their strength and stamina. As a result, breathing becomes more difficult and breathing in and out feels like hard work. Consequently, this adds to the feeling of fatigue, which is already a debilitating symptom of Multiple Sclerosis. Furthermore, the weakness of the breathing muscles may also impede speech and voice production.

How to improve breathing strength and stamina

A 2007 study shows that Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) significantly increases breathing muscle strength in people with MS. Additionally, IMT improves how well the lungs work in people with Multiple Sclerosis who have minimal to moderate disability.

The effects of Multiple Sclerosis on your body

Healthline, the fastest growing health information site, has created this medically reviewed infographic showing the effects of MS on the body.

The infographic itself provides a quick look at the effects of MS on the body. However, the rest of the article goes on to explain in more depth how this progressive neurodegenerative condition has an impact on the whole body.

New Asthma Treatment for Severe Asthma

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), are consulting again on the safety and efficacy of a new asthma treatment. The new treatment, bronchial thermoplasty, is likely to be offered to adults with severe asthma. The procedure involves applying thermal energy (heat) to the inside walls of the airways.

New asthma treatment

Bronchial thermoplasty will take place under sedation or general anaesthetic. Short pulses of radiofrequency energy are applied to the airway wall. Following that, patients will need to attend an additional two sessions, with 3-week intervals, to complete the procedure.

The aim of this new treatment is to reduce the smooth muscle mass lining the airways, decreasing their ability to constrict. Hopes are that by having this procedure, the severity and frequency of severe asthma attacks may decrease. NICE is currently in the process of considering the evidence for this treatment. Additionally, it’s listening to the views of specialist advisers with knowledge of the procedure.

Furthermore, to ensure safety, NICE is recommending that only a multidisciplinary team treat patients. In addition, they recommend that only specialist centres with on-site access to intensive care should carry out the procedure. Finally, they are proposing that only clinicians with experience of bronchial thermoplasty and managing severe asthma should perform the procedure.

As it stands, NICE believe there is adequate evidence to support the use of this new asthma treatment.

Severe asthma

In their consultation document, NICE say that in severe asthma, the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and narrow. Furthermore, this narrows the airways, making it harder for air to pass through. This makes it harder to breathe. And it is this that bronchial thermoplasty aims to tackle.

Complementary treatment for asthma

Research shows there to be an alternative, complimentary asthma treatment for opening up the airways and assist in easier breathing. This treatment is Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT). Simply put, it is breathing muscle training, such as with the POWERbreathe IMT device. It too is clinically proven. Furthermore, it is drug-free.

The research reaches the conclusion that six-months of specific inspiratory muscle training improves inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. It also results in improvement in asthma symptoms, hospitalisations for asthma, visits to the emergency department, absence from school or work, and medication consumption in patients with asthma.

Alternative treatment for asthma – IMT

Inspiratory Muscle Training, such as with POWERbreathe IMT, is easy to use, straight out of the box. Because it is drug-free, there are only minimal precautions and contraindications that the Healthcare Professional needs to be aware of before prescribing IMT.

POWERbreathe IMT is an evidence-based, non-invasive asthma treatment. In fact, it is the amount of medical research behind the rigorous assessment that led to the POWERbreathe Medic being made available for prescription on the NHS. It offers people with asthma a clinically-proven method of reducing symptoms and putting them in control of their asthma.

Research shows that after only 3-weeks of IMT, asthma symptoms improve by up to 75%. Furthermore, patients with asthma experience improvement of symptoms, quality of life and a reduction in the consumption of medication of up to 79%.

In fact, three separate studies show an average 51% reduction in β2-agonist consumption (from 3.9 to 1.6 puffs per day) after IMT. One study also shows a decrease in corticosteroid use ~80%.

Finally, longer observations show that 6-months of IMT reduces absence from school/work (by ~95%) and use of healthcare resources (by ~75%).

What is World Asthma Day

Every year the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) organises World Asthma Day. The aim of this awareness day is to reduce asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality in every corner of the globe. Their first awareness day was held in 1998. And so this year they are celebrating the 20th annual World Asthma Day. And every year they have a theme. The theme for 2018 is “Never too early, never too late. It’s always the right time to address airways disease.”

World Asthma Day 2018

This year’s theme asks both patients and healthcare providers to evaluate asthma symptoms, regardless of the time in that person’s life. In addition, they ask for actions to be taken to ensure a person’s asthma is controlled. For example, writing an Asthma Plan that contains all you need to help control your asthma, such as a list of asthma triggers, is a core part of asthma management.

Asthma triggers

There are many things that may trigger an asthma attack. In fact, anything that irritates the airways and sets off symptoms is considered an asthma trigger. Exercise is one such trigger. Yet evidence shows that people with asthma will benefit from exercise. In fact, there are many world-class athletes, including Paula Radcliffe MBE, that have asthma.

Asthma and exercise

As long as your asthma symptoms are under control then asthma shouldn’t stop you from enjoying these benefits of exercise:

  • Boosts the immune system, reducing the possibility of coughs and colds triggering symptoms
  • Increases bone and muscle strength
  • Improves overall health
  • Improves how well the lungs work, reducing the feeling of being breathless

Asthma treatment

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute explain that asthma is a long-term disease that requires managing. And because there is no cure, the purpose of asthma treatment is to control the disease. This includes two types of medicines:

  1. Long-term control medicines – these help reduce airway inflammation and prevent asthma symptoms.
  2. Quick-relief, or ‘rescue’ medicines – these relieve asthma symptoms that have the potential to flare up.

However, there is also a drug-free therapy that is clinically proven to help reduce asthma symptoms – Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT). Always speak to a medical professional about your medical issues or concerns first.

Natural asthma treatment without drugs

Inspiratory muscle training is a drug-free breathing training intervention for people with dyspnoea (difficult or laboured breathing). It’s not surprising, therefore, that clinical trials are unanimously supportive of IMT in the management of asthma.

In trials, patients with asthma experienced a reduction in their laboured breathing in as little as 3 weeks’ inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, they felt improvements in their quality of life. In addition, longer-term observations following 3 weeks of IMT were also impressive:

  • Reduces absence from school/work (by ~95%)
  • Reduces the consumption of medication (by ~79%)
  • Symptoms improve by up to 75%

WHO asthma statistics

  • Asthma is a major noncommunicable disease
  • Approximately 235 million people suffer from asthma (2017) which is common among children
  • Medication can control asthma symptoms
  • Asthma management helps people with asthma to enjoy a quality of life
  • Many people have undiagnosed asthma

Asthma – how it affects breathing

Asthma is a long-term breathing condition that affects the airways. These are the small tubes that transport air in and out of the lungs. It’s these tubes that become inflamed when they come into contact with something that ‘irritates’ them. Consequently, the airways become narrower. And it’s for this reason that people with asthma feel breathless and wheezy. But these symptoms will vary in severity from person to person.

What causes asthma

In the general population, asthma affects approximately 235 million people. And here in the UK, one in every 12 adults is receiving treatment for it.

Asthma tends to run in families, so genetic predisposition is one risk factor. Another factor is environmental. For instance, exposure to particles that may irritate the airways or give rise to an allergic reaction. Such irritants may include tobacco smoke, house dust mites, pet dander, pollen or air pollution.

In addition to genetic predisposition and environmental irritants, there are also other triggers. These can include physical exercise and cold air. So, it’s no surprise to discover that exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is the most common medical issue among winter Olympic athletes. In fact, almost 50% of cross-country skiers in the 2018 Winter Olympics have EIA. But it isn’t only the cross-country skiers who’re suffering. Short-track speed skaters (43%), figure skaters (21%) and ice hockey player (15%) also suffer.

What is EIA

Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is a condition where exercise itself becomes the trigger for an asthma event. Symptoms will surface only while exercising, or immediately following exercise. And the symptoms feel worst of all after exercise and then start to gradually improve. Treatment for EIA is the same, with long-term medicines that are taken daily. But there is also a natural treatment that is drug-free that can be used alongside medication. And that is Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT).

Natural asthma treatment without drugs

Data exists from five randomised controlled trials that are unanimously supportive of the use of IMT with POWERbreathe in the management of asthma. In fact, the POWERbreathe Medic is clinically proven by a wealth of research, as well as, the first non-pharmacological treatment for respiratory disease and the only product of its kind on the drug tariff. It is a non-invasive treatment that is drug-free, with no side effects or drug interactions.

POWERbreathe IMT is not suitable for patients with certain conditions so please first consult your specialist respiratory health doctor.

How asthma affects exercise

Breathlessness is a common feature of exercise. Shortness of breath, coughing and wheezing are also symptoms of asthma. So, imagine being an Olympic athlete performing high-intensity training above your lactate threshold. Then imagine being a winter Olympic athlete, with asthma. Breathing moves out of its comfort zone and increases steeply. And with the breathing muscles weakening and tiring, breathing feels harder still. It would be beneficial therefore to improve the state of the inspiratory muscles, mainly the diaphragm and intercostal.

It is possible to exercise specifically the inspiratory muscles with an inspiratory muscle training (IMT) device, such as POWERbreathe IMT. Such a device provides the inspiratory muscles with a resistance to breathe in against. This resistance training makes the inspiratory muscles work harder, improving breathing strength and stamina and reducing breathing fatigue.

What exercise helps asthma

Any form of exercise is good for you and will help keep heart and lungs healthy. In fact, many well-known, world-class athletes have this condition, such as runner Paula Radcliffe and cyclist Laura Trott.

If your symptoms are well managed, and your GP gives the go-ahead, then there’s no reason to limit your choice of exercise.

Practical tips for exercising with asthma

  • Warm-up first, including an inspiratory muscle warm-up with an IMT device
  • Make sure you have your inhaler with you
  • Ensure people around you know that you have asthma
  • If you feel your symptoms coming on during exercise, take your reliever inhaler and wait until symptoms subside

Heart Failure Awareness Week 2018

What does heart failure feel like?

According to the British Heart Foundation, there are over half a million people in the UK living with heart failure (HF). They say they experience:

  1. Shortness of breath, not only during an activity but also at rest.
  2. Swollen feet, ankles and legs.
  3. Feeling unusually weak and tired most of the time, and feeling exhausted after an activity or exercise.

What causes heart failure?

It usually occurs if the heart is too weak, or ‘stiff’, to pump blood around the body as well as it used to. Consequently, the heart needs some support to help it work better again. Although HF is more common in the elderly, it can also occur at any age.

One of the most common reasons for the heart weakening is heart muscle damage. This may occur following a heart attack. But there are other conditions that can also lead to heart failure, including:

  • High blood pressure
  • Heart rhythm problems (also known as arrhythmias)
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Congenital heart disease

What can you do to prevent heart failure?

According to NHS Choices, there are a few things you can do yourself to help reduce your risk of HF. The aim of these prevention strategies is to lower blood pressure and reduce levels of bad cholesterol in the blood.

  • Tip 1: Eat a healthy, balanced diet with low-fat, high-fibre and five portions of fruit and vegetables.
  • Tip 2: Stay active with regular exercise to make the heart and circulatory system more efficient, helping to regulate blood pressure.
  • Tip 3: Maintain a healthy weight – you can find your body mass index using a BMI calculator, or ask your GP.
  • Tip 4: Give up smoking to reduce the risk of developing furring of the arteries.
  • Tip 5: Cut back on the consumption of alcohol.

What is heart failure treatment?

A cure for this condition is only a possibility when there is a treatable cause, such as replacing damaged heart valves. Otherwise, treatment focuses on controlling the symptoms. By controlling the symptoms people are able to live full and active lives.

Sometimes implantable devices, such as a pacemaker, or other surgery will be needed. However, for the majority of people, a combination of medication and lifestyle changes will be sufficient to control and stabilise symptoms.

How heart failure affects daily living

Because the heart isn’t able to pump blood around the body as well as it used to, the load on the breathing muscles, mainly the diaphragm, increases. This results in a significant contribution to the feeling of breathlessness. Consequently, this affects a person’s everyday life. In fact, something like simple everyday tasks feel tiring. As a result, quality of life diminishes.

Did you know?

During February 11- 17, the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) will increase national awareness about the severity of heart failure. In Europe, Heart Failure Awareness Week will fall in May.

These awareness days take place because the number of people with heart failure is increasing. In fact, projections show it will rise by 46% (2030), according to the American Heart Association’s 2017 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update.

Heart failure (HF) is a long-term condition. There is currently no cure and symptoms will get worse over time. Sadly HF also has a poor prognosis, with 30-40% of patients dying within a year. However, if diagnosed early enough, symptoms can be controlled for many years.

Improving quality of life

There are many research studies showing that Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) successfully increases both inspiratory strength and endurance. They also show that stronger breathing muscles will alleviate breathlessness and improve functional status in chronic heart failure.

In one particular study, findings reveal that in patients with HF and inspiratory muscle weakness, IMT results in:

  • Marked improvement in inspiratory muscle strength
  • Improvement in functional capacity
  • Improvement in ventilatory response to exercise
  • Improvement in recovery oxygen uptake kinetics
  • Improvement in quality of life

Training the inspiratory muscles

POWERbreathe IMT is a hand-held breathing muscle training device. It is drug-free with no known side effects and no interactions with existing treatments. There are also no reports of any adverse events. It is easy to use as you only need to breathe forcefully IN through the device for 30 breaths, twice a day.

Because the cardiovascular strain of POWERbreathe training is very low, it is suitable for even the most physically compromised patients and is particularly helpful in patients who are too ill for rehabilitation.

POWERbreathe training is completely safe for the vast majority of patients. However there may be small theoretical risks for some patients. For instance, IMT will not be a recommendation for patients with a history of spontaneous pneumothorax.

The POWERbreathe Medic is approved by the NHS’s PPA and is available on prescription in the UK.

Always check with your doctor first before undertaking anything new for the treatment of any medical condition.

 

Relating to COPD – a report that looks into living with COPD

The World Health Organization (WHO) predicts COPD will be the third leading cause of death in 2030. In fact, the chief causes of death globally has shifted. Whereas the main cause of death used to be from infectious diseases, it is now from noncommunicable diseases. Diseases with chronic conditions, such as COPD.

Living with COPD

COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) is a group of lung conditions that cause airflow blockage and result in breathing-related problems. It includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. The narrowing of the airways makes it harder for people with COPD to breathe in and out. And it’s these breathing difficulties that can affect many aspects of daily life. It can reduce quality of life.

There are many people living with the disease that know how to manage their condition. However, there are millions of others who are living with undiagnosed symptoms of COPD.

Statistics

The UK is 12th on the list of the top 20 countries for COPD mortality in the world. However, rates are higher in New Zealand and the United States. These statistics for COPD are part of the Respiratory Health of the Nation project, for The British Lung Foundation.

Relating to COPD

This report, however, Relating to COPD, takes an alternative look into those living with COPD. It has been compiled from the viewpoint of those with experience of COPD. So, in fact, it looks into the physical and emotional effects of COPD. An online forum inspired the idea. The study looked at keywords and phrases to understand how living with COPD makes people feel, and how deeply it can impact their daily lives.

Breathe easier with POWERbreathe IMT – reviewed in Daily Mail

The Daily Mail online features worldwide news stories from the Daily Mail and Sunday newspapers. It is the second-biggest-selling daily newspaper in the UK. And today (21st November 2017) online it features an article about devices that will help you to breathe easier. One criterion specified by freelance journalist, Adrian Monti, is that the devices are to be available on the High Street. Another, quite rightly, is that the devices must be able to back up their claims.

Chest Physician chooses ‘Breathe easier’ devices

In order to approach this from a clinical viewpoint, Adrian has been speaking to a specialist chest physician and GP.

Dr Simon Taggart is a dual accredited Consultant Chest & General Physician. He has wide experience in the field of general medicine and is a specialist in respiratory medicine at The University of Manchester. His current NHS post is with the Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust. He is also Sub-Speciality Tutor for Respiratory Medicine at The University of Manchester. He’s an expert.

Because of his expertise, Dr Taggart is knowledgeable about the devices and solutions that claim to make you breathe easier, and that are available on the High Street.

Device reviews

For each device that was suggested, supporting data and research were assessed. And in order to be able to provide a rating for each product, each one was personally tested.

Each review in the paper begins with stating the device’s ‘claim’. Dr Taggart then follows this up with his ‘verdict’ after using the product. And finally, a rating out of 10 is awarded. This he comes to after assessing the related research and user experience.

POWERbreathe IMT – a selected device

Although the description of how to use POWERbreathe IMT is inaccurate, the specified aim is. And that is to ‘gradually make breathing muscles stronger’.

You make the breathing muscles stronger by breathing IN through the device against a resistance. It’s this resistance that makes your breathing muscles work harder. And the more you use it the easier the training gets. So this is when you increase the resistance to challenge your breathing muscles again. It’s the same principle as increasing the weight of dumbbells to increase your arm strength. In fact, it is affectionately known as ‘dumbbells for your diaphragm’. And stronger breathing muscles result in a resistance to fatigue too. So both your breathing strength and stamina improve. In addition, POWERbreathe IMT is scientifically proven, and because it is drug-free, it’s being used in many clinical trials where being short of breath is an issue.

POWERbreathe – the verdict

In the paper, Dr Taggart reports using POWERbreathe IMT devices with patients to treat chronic bronchitis. He says that strengthening their respiratory muscles with it helps ease their breathing. He goes on to add that it’s also useful for those who suffer from weak lungs that would benefit from a bit of training.

Rated: 9/10

Breathe easier with POWERbreathe IMT - reviewed in Daily Mail

Also worthy of inclusion – Shaker by POWERbreathe

With the premise that a device must stand up to its claim to make breathing easier and be available on the High Street, we feel another device to be worthy of inclusion. That of the Shaker by POWERbreathe.

The Shaker is a hand-held device that is designed to loosen mucus. And it is also suitable for children (with supervision) as it’s so easy to use. Simply put, as you breathe out through the device the weighted ball inside ‘shakes’ mucus. This loosens it so that you’re able to cough it up and expel it. The result is that you’re able to breathe easier.

The Shaker by POWERbreathe is available in three models, one of which is autoclavable. As a result, it’s able to be cleaned in an autoclave, sterilising it and making it suitable for multiple-use and clinical settings.