Respiratory Physiotherapy using the Shaker by POWERbreathe

If you have a disease that results in sputum production, your physiotherapist will prescribe respiratory physiotherapy for you. Initially, this will involve the physio assessing you to identify the problem. As a result, management techniques and a treatment plan will be put in place. This will include airway clearance techniques, such as oscillating PEP. Different types of mucus clearance device use oscillating PEP, including the Shaker by POWERbreathe. Such devices combine the techniques of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) with oscillations. Your physio will refer to these as ‘oscillatory positive expiratory pressure’, or OPEP devices.

Respiratory Physiotherapy using the Shaker by POWERbreathe, by BreatheWellPhysio
Respiratory Physiotherapy using the Shaker by POWERbreathe, courtesy of Breathe Well Physio.

Shaker mucus clearance devices

The Shaker device will help to shift your bronchial secretions by combining PEP and oscillations. This combination will help you to expectorate the increasing amount of mucus you’re producing. By coughing out more mucus, you’re helping to prevent infections of your respiratory tract. It is also helpful if you have hay fever, which can make symptoms of asthma, such as coughing and wheezing, feel worse. Devices like the Shaker are easy-to-use without medical supervision, so you may decide to use it as an alternative, or additional, treatment to your prescribed medical respiratory physiotherapy.

Although it works similarly to the older Acapella mucus clearance device, research reveals the Shaker to have better linearity at higher airflows. The same research also finds the pressure amplitude produced by the Shaker and Flutter mucus clearance device to be greater at low and high pressures. Finally, the same study shows a higher frequency of oscillation for the Shaker and Flutter at an intermediate pressure. This is all beneficial in helping you get the most from your therapy.

The Shaker Classic, Shaker Deluxe and Shaker Medic Plus by POWERbreathe all mobilise mucus using oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (OPEP). An important point to note is that the Shaker devices are all gravity-dependent, as opposed to gravity-independent. This is worth bearing in mind as a 2018 study finds,

“the gravity-dependent devices were the ones to display close mechanical performances and produce optimal operational parameters at the simulated exhalation settings.”

https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/52/suppl_62/OA5191

By contrast, this same study finds that the two gravity-independent OPEP devices, the Acapella Choice and Aerobika, “probably require higher expiratory pressure to reach theoretical therapeutic effectiveness.”

Therapeutic effects of the Shaker

If you have a condition such as chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis or asthma, then you’ll be only too aware of the excessive amount of mucus you produce. You may also notice a change in the type of mucus you’re producing. Because of this, it’s no surprise that you’ll be having difficulty clearing the mucus, even after coughing. But this is where using the Shaker by POWERbreathe for respiratory physiotherapy can help you.

The Shaker uses a stainless-steel ball, weighing 30g, to help clear bronchial secretions. It does this by ‘shaking’ and causing a vibration, or percussion, in your chest. This happens as you exhale through the mouthpiece. As you breathe out through the device, the 30g steel ball provides a resistance. This causes the ball to move and shake and makes it more difficult for you to breathe out. All this shaking and vibration loosens the mucus. After breathing out through it a few times, you’ll find you’ll need to huff, or cough, to expel the mucus. You can see this being demonstrated in the video above. After a few uses, you’ll begin to work out for yourself how long and how frequently you’ll need to use your Shaker device, as everyone is different.

To further enhance the therapeutic effect of your Shaker airway clearance device, its mouthpiece is designed to allow you to use it in a sitting or lying position.

Respiratory physiotherapy techniques

In respiratory physiotherapy, no one technique fits all. A therapist must take into consideration the strength of their patient, the thickness of their mucus and where it is located. However, as a patient, the price may be a criterion for selecting the most suitable device. In this 2013 study, assessment of the Flutter, Acapella and Shaker shows all three mechanical behaviours to be reliable. However, the Shaker is likely to be the most cost-effective.

This type of respiratory physiotherapy aims to help you clear excessive phlegm, sputum, mucus and catarrh. Consequently, breathing effort reduces and exercise tolerance improves, helping you return to a better quality of life.

Young children benefit from respiratory physiotherapy too, but they will require something with a lighter resistance to exhale against. If you have children, you’ll know that you’ll also need to make their therapy more fun. Blowing games using the Flowball by POWERbreathe can help them to clear secretions.

Precautions

You should always consult a doctor before starting any treatment if you’re concerned about any medical issue.

Breathing at High Altitude during Tour de France

Tour de France 2019 is a gruelling event. The 21 stage race begins on the flat. But this isn’t for long. The race winds its way through flat, hilly and finally mountainous terrain. This year, we now know, is one of the most demanding Tour de France races. It includes 7 mountain stages with 5 mountain-top finishes. Because the seven mountain stages climb above 2,000 metres, it is one of the highest Tours for many years. This adds another challenge for the riders, that of breathing at high altitude. This is particularly challenging for riders of the 2019 Tour, as the highest point in the race, the Col de l’Iseran mountain pass has an altitude of 2,770m.

Breathing at high altitude

As a cyclist climbs to high altitude breathing increases. This happens automatically. The reason for this is because the body is responding to less oxygen in each breath. As a result, ventilation increases as they try to increase oxygen uptake. However, in spite of an increase in breathing, less oxygen will reach the working muscles, such as the legs. This is because signals are sent to the nervous system telling it to redirect oxygen from the legs to the diaphragm in order to keep up with breathing at altitude. Consequently, the cyclist’s leg muscles begin to suffer from fatigue. Inevitably, this affects performance.

Effects of high altitude breathing

Breathing harder and quicker is an automatic response to the fall in air pressure. In addition to this, the heart works harder too. It does this to try and increase the flow of oxygen-carrying red blood cells to the lungs. It’s a desperate bid to ensure the lungs don’t ‘steal’ the oxygen-carrying red blood cells from straining muscles.

In this article, 2018 Tour de France winner Geraint Thomas says,

“You just can’t do the same powers that you do at sea level… It is just like a thinner sort of air, really, up there. You can just tell, like, when you’re breathing, you’re just not getting quite as much oxygen in the lungs as you normally would.”

Another consequence of the challenges that breathing at high altitude inflicts on the body, is that of greater quantities of lactic acid. Cycling at altitude requires intense power and energy to climb the hills. But the body’s response to trying to produce energy with less oxygen is to produce larger amounts of lactic acid. It’s the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles that causes that feeling of ‘muscle burn’. It’s also responsible for slowing a cyclist down as it reduces the muscles ability to function.

Active.com explain that lactic acid is the end product of anaerobic metabolism. It says that a build-up of lactic acid occurs when there is insufficient oxygen to produce the energy required by the exercise. Furthermore, they say that when a very high level of work is reached, as in the Tour, lactic acid production becomes constant. As a result, the cyclist will experience acute muscle fatigue.

Preparing for the challenges of breathing at altitude

This 2019 Review Article in Frontiers in Physiology investigates the use of respiratory muscle training (RMT), including inspiratory muscle training (IMT) with POWERbreathe, for acclimatising to the altitude. The review provides evidence that such training,

“…has the potential to minimize at least some of the limiting factors related to the respiratory system occurring during training / competition at altitude / in hypoxia.”

It goes on to suggest the expected benefits may include:

  1. A delay in the onset of premature fatigue.
  2. A delay in respiratory muscle metaboreflex onset/activation.
  3. An improvement in clearance and tolerance to anaerobic metabolite products.
  4. A decrease in the perception of dyspnea (‘air hunger’).
  5. An increase in oxygen saturation values.
  6. A more favourable blood redistribution to the locomotor muscles.

Recovering from high altitude breathing problems

By incorporating breathing exercises for high altitude before the Tour de France or Giro d’Italia, cyclists will cope better with the challenges of breathing at high altitude. Inspiratory Muscle Training, such as with POWERbreathe, increases the strength and stamina of the breathing muscles, reducing breathing fatigue. Even better would be to perform IMT during turbo training. This will target the inspiratory muscles in the hunched position the athlete will be in during cycling.

Recovering from high levels of lactic acid

For cyclists in the Tour de France and Giro d’Italia an IMT recovery session is proven to be beneficial as it:

Research shows that breathing against a small inspiratory load immediately after exercise reduces lactate by 16%. It also reduces lactate as soon as exercise finishes, unlike traditional active recovery which may take 5-minutes to clear lactate. Another bonus for Tour de France and Giro d’Italia riders is that subsequent research demonstrates a post-exercise inspiratory resistive loading (after a Wingate test) reduces post-exercise effort perception and improves peak power on subsequent all-out maximal-intensity exercise. This is obviously beneficial when riders need to perform at their best, day-after-day.

 

Smokers lungs work better after POWERbreathe IMT

This new study investigates the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on smokers and non-smokers. Researchers from Ondokuz Mayıs University and Gaziantep University in Turkey look into how IMT may affect pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in both these groups.

Pulmonary function & respiratory muscle strength

Pulmonary function indicates how well a person’s lungs are working to help them breathe. There are different tests that measure pulmonary function, otherwise known as lung function.

Respiratory muscle strength is an indication of how much pressure the breathing muscles generate when a person breathes in or out. Assessment of respiratory muscle strength involves measuring MIP or MEP. MIP or maximal inspiratory pressure reflects the strength of the inspiratory muscles, such as the diaphragm. Meanwhile MEP or maximal expiratory pressure reflects the strength of the expiratory muscles.

The IMT program

For the IMT program, subjects use the POWERbreathe Classic IMT device. The procedure consists of 30 x 2 dynamic inspiratory efforts with a 1-minute interval. They perform this for four weeks, seven days a week. The reason researchers chose this procedure is that it has been previously applied in healthy individuals.

Smokers group, non-smokers & placebo groups

Forty-two healthy males enrol in this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental design study. There are 16 subjects in the IMT smokers group (IMTS), 16 in the IMT non-smokers group (IMTN) with the final 10 subjects in the placebo group. This final group receive a sham ‘placebo’ treatment that will have no real effect.

By using a double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental design study, researchers can test out a therapy. The placebo treatment will feel just like the actual treatment, in this case, IMT. The reason for this is so that both the subject and the researcher’s expectations will not affect the outcome. Furthermore, a double-blind controlled study means that neither the researchers nor the subjects taking part know who will be receiving which treatment. This is vital in helping to avoid bias when measuring outcomes.

For the study, the experimental groups (IMTS and IMTN) perform POWERbreathe IMT at 50% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Researchers increase this each week. Meanwhile, in the placebo group, subjects perform POWERbreathe IMT at only 15% of MIP.

Improvements occur in smokers after IMT

Results of the study show significant improvements in respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary functions after the 4-week POWERbreathe IMT program. Even more promising is the fact that improvements in smokers are greater. Potentially, this is a result of a:

“greater influence of exercise on smokers’ lung microbiome in reversing the negative effects of smoking.”

For smokers, this means that their stronger inspiratory muscles will improve their ability to breathe in more air, for longer and with less fatigue. This will have a positive impact on daily life by helping them improve their ability to perform daily activities that may have been prohibitive before.

POWERbreathe ISO Certified

POWERbreathe receives ISO accreditation certificate of approval for ‘Design & manufacture of medical devices for improvement of respiratory function’

The Quality Management System of POWERbreathe International Ltd has been approved by Lloyd’s Register to the following Quality Management System Standards set out under United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) accreditation:

The Quality Management System

POWERbreathe International Limited commits to the overall aim of maximising customer satisfaction. We will provide impartial advice on what is appropriate for the customer and comply with such requirements that are necessary to supply high quality medical devices for improvement of respiratory function.

Hypoxic Endurance Exercise Performance benefits from IMT

This new study (2019) looks into whether chronic IMT improves hypoxic endurance exercise performance.

Endurance exercise performance

The study, in the International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, is using a cycling time trial to measure endurance exercise performance. Endurance exercise is typically performed at submaximal intensity. The purpose of this is to estimate VO2max, or ‘aerobic fitness’. The measurement VO2max is the maximum amount of oxygen a person will consume during intense exercise. In fact, cycling time trials offer the ideal exercise to increase both heart rate and breathing. Similarly, so do running and swimming.

What is IMT?

IMT is a form of resistance training for the breathing muscles. The term IMT stands for inspiratory muscle training. The inspiratory muscles, the breathing muscles, are the ones that draw air into the lungs. The main inspiratory muscle is the diaphragm. Like any other group of muscles, the inspiratory muscles benefit from training too. Inspiratory muscle training, such as with POWERbreathe, provides the stimulus for that training. Following IMT, the breathing muscles adapt and become stronger after only a few weeks. This results in exercise feeling easier and an improvement therefore in performance.

Why IMT?

Although breathing comes naturally, some of the time it can feel like an effort. This may be due to the demand endurance exercise places on breathing. It may be due to a respiratory issue. Either way, it’s not uncommon for the respiratory muscles to fatigue, just like any other muscle.

If the respiratory muscles are weak from disease or exercise is overloading them, breathing demand will not be met. As a result, breathing will start to feel shallow and rapid. Sustaining this type of breathing is impossible. Furthermore, the more rapid the breathing, the more oxygen they require and the more carbon dioxide they produce. Consequently, oxygen is re-directed from the skeletal muscles, such as arms or legs, to the breathing muscles, where it is most needed. This results in fatigue of the skeletal muscles.

Inspiratory muscle training helps the body meet the needs of both the respiratory muscles and the skeletal muscles by improving their strength and stamina. The way IMT achieves this is by providing a resistance to breathe in against. POWERbreathe IMT is just like a ‘dumbbell for your diaphragm’.

Study results

Data from this recent study suggest that,

“performing 6 weeks of inspiratory muscle training may benefit hypoxic endurance exercise performance lasting 30-40 minutes.”

Natural Remedy for Hay Fever Cough

Hay fever may make symptoms of asthma, such as coughing and wheezing, feel worse. In fact, people with respiratory symptoms may experience continuous coughing as a result of their hay fever. This is likely to be due to the type of allergens affecting them. However, if a cough becomes unusually persistent, it is always best to report it to a doctor. But for those with asthma already taking medication, finding a natural remedy for hay fever induced coughing is of interest.

Natural Remedy for Hay Fever Induced Coughing

Coughing is the body’s natural way of trying to clear the lungs of fluid or mucus. Mucus production increases as a result of respiratory infections, such as a cold or the flu. However, mucus also increases when a person has an allergic reaction. In the case of hay fever, this will be to a type of pollen. It’s this allergic reaction that can cause persistent coughing, as the body tries to shift mucus, or phlegm, from the lungs.

Phlegm is produced by the respiratory system. When there is a large amount of phlegm, it can clog the airways. When phlegm is present in large amounts, the body naturally coughs to expel it. This resulting cough from clogging of the airways is particularly distressing in people with asthma.

Antihistamines and decongestants are traditionally taken to help relieve symptoms of allergies and hay fever. However, neither will get rid of phlegm on the chest. Furthermore, both are drugs. Additionally, an expectorant will help to make mucus thinner so it is easier to cough up, but that too is made from a type of drug.

People with asthma know how important it is to ensure that any additional medication they take is safe to use with their prescribed asthma treatment. It is helpful, therefore, to find a drug-free cough treatment that will help with mucus clearance. A drug-free cough treatment, by its nature, will have no drug interactions.

How to Clear Mucus

A natural remedy for hay fever cough is to use a mucus clearance device. The Shaker offers chesty cough relief by shaking loose the phlegm on the chest.

The weighted ball inside the Shaker rises as the user breathes out through the device. It then falls under its own weight. However, it does this so quickly that it feels like a vibration. It’s this vibrating action that mobilises lung secretions, breaking them down and making them thinner and less sticky. This makes it easier for the user to then expel the phlegm. A productive cough will result after using the Shaker; sometimes immediately and sometimes it may be an hour later. But the productive cough that the Shaker induces will help the user to eliminate the mucus. Ultimately, this brings much relief from chest congestion.

Shaker devices are ideal for ‘shaking’ loose mucus and catarrh that is associated with:

  • Chronic Bronchitis
  • Bronchiectasis
  • Emphysema
  • Asthma
  • Cystic Fibrosis

Shaker devices are also suitable for children to use, under parental guidance, as they are easy-to-use and effective. Please always speak to a medical professional first about medical issues or concerns and also read the precautions before using.

How to Keep Your Lungs Healthy

If you are finding breathing difficult because you have a lung condition, the European Lung Foundation believes exercise is helpful. In fact, you can discover how exercise helps to keep your lungs healthy in one of our previous blogs, How To Keep Your Lungs Healthy With Exercise. Additionally, by eating a healthy diet you can also help to keep your lungs healthy. If you find this topic to be of interest, then you may like to read another one of our blogs, Foods for Keeping your Lungs Healthy.

Acclimatisation to High Altitude – POWERbreathe IMT is Beneficial

There is a new Review Article in Frontiers in Physiology (January 2019) that looks into using respiratory/inspiratory muscle training for acclimatisation to altitude.

Respiratory muscle training

Respiratory muscle training, or RMT, is a programme of exercises that aim to improve the function of the respiratory muscles. Otherwise known as the ‘breathing pump’ muscles, the expiratory muscles and the inspiratory muscles make up the respiratory muscles. It’s the inspiratory muscles that we use when we breathe in. The main inspiratory muscle is the diaphragm, but to a lesser extent, the intercostal muscles also help with inhalation. To help improve the strength and stamina of these inspiratory muscles, respiratory muscle training will include Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT).

Inspiratory Muscle Training

Inspiratory muscle training, such as with POWERbreathe, uses resistance to provide the training effect. When breathing in against the resistance, the breathing muscles have to work harder. As a result, they get stronger. Consequently, breathing stamina improves resulting in a reduction in breathing fatigue. There is numerous research validating this form of breathing training and, as a result, it is the most commonly used.

The review

For the review, researchers perform a comprehensive search, analysing seven appropriate studies. Three of these studies refer to using respiratory muscle endurance training (RME with isocapnic hyperpnea). However, the remaining four studies use respiratory muscle strength training (RMS with POWERbreathe IMT).

Acclimatisation to altitude

Studies suggest that respiratory muscle training with IMT is a useful preparatory method for enhancing respiratory muscle efficiency 4-6 weeks before being exposed to hypoxia/altitude.

It is evident that breathing during exercise in hypoxia is associated with increased energy costs (20–30%) when compared to normoxia. Therefore, it is more likely to cause respiratory muscle fatigue. However, inspiratory muscle training will help to combat this. This is because IMT trains the inspiratory muscles to become stronger, increasing stamina. Consequently, breathing muscle fatigue reduces.

It, therefore, seems apparent that breathing muscle training has the potential to minimise at least some of the limiting respiratory factors that occur during training and competition in hypoxia/at altitude.

Benefits of acclimatisation to altitude using IMT

The Review suggests that both elite athletes and non-elite individuals may benefit from RMT, including:

  1. A delay in the onset of premature fatigue.
  2. A delay in respiratory muscle metaboreflex onset/activation.
  3. An improvement in clearance and tolerance to anaerobic metabolite products.
  4. A decrease in the perception of dyspnea (‘air hunger’).
  5. An increase in oxygen saturation values.
  6. A more favourable blood redistribution to the locomotor muscles.

Finally, evidence from this review finds that respiratory muscle training is an effective stimulus for improving the strength and endurance of the respiratory muscles. In fact, it’s these adaptive responses that contribute to the improvement of ventilatory function and efficiency. In translation, this means that respiratory muscle training is very likely to improve exercise performance in normoxia and particularly in hypoxia/altitude.

Lower Blood Pressure with POWERbreathe IMT

The University of Colorado Boulder is using the POWERbreathe K-Series in their independent research. They are investigating the effects of just 30 breaths of inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST). Specifically, they are looking to see if it could lower blood pressure and reduce heart attack risk. They are also investigating whether it could help you think more clearly and boost sports performance.

Lower blood pressure

One of the key findings of the research so far is that 30 breaths of IMST (about five minutes) will lower blood pressure. Crucially, with about half the tests completed, researchers report significant drops in blood pressure and improvements in large-artery function. In fact, their findings show that about 5-minutes of IMST lowers blood pressure as much as aerobic exercise and more than some medications.

Other preliminary findings

The research findings also suggest that just 5-minutes of IMST may also boost cognitive function. Furthermore, their findings show that it may also improve fitness and increase sports performance. In fact, these improvements are already proven in previous research studies. However, this study reiterates such findings.

With the help of the university’s new National Institute on Ageing grant, researchers are launching a clinical trial.

The research

Research subjects will either be a part of a sham group (using low/no IMST) or the IMST group. The IMST group will perform 30 breaths of inspiratory muscle strength training (taking approximately 5-minutes). IMST is strength training for the muscles you use to inhale. Both groups will be performing their version of IMST over a period of 6 weeks. Researchers are hoping that by doing this for 5 minutes a day in the comfort of their own home, people will get health benefits they otherwise might not get.

The tests

Researchers will be performing tests to evaluate:

  • Vascular function – how healthy the blood vessels are
  • Cerebral vascular function – how healthy the blood vessels in the brain are
  • Cognitive function
  • Physical performance – VO2 max testing assesses this
  • Motor function

Results so far are showing that the IMST group, compared to sham subjects, are lowering their blood pressure and improving blood vessel health. Also, the IMST group is performing better on certain cognitive and memory tests. In addition, the IMST group are able to keep their heart rate and oxygen consumption lower during exercise. Consequently, subjects are also showing an increase in exercise tolerance time too.

Positive outcomes

With all this evidence, researchers hope that by using IMST, people may be able to get their blood pressure under control, decrease their risk of chronic conditions and live healthier lives.

Pilates Plus IMT Improves Lung Function

Researchers from Brazil are looking at the effects of combining Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) with Pilates on lung function in elderly women. The reason for this is because ageing affects the respiratory system. In fact, it can change the composition of the lung’s connective tissue.

Ageing and the lungs

Ageing will ultimately affect bones and muscles. Moreover, natural ageing also affects the bones and muscles of the chest. Consequently, it may affect the shape of the ribcage. As a result, the ribcage may no longer expand or contract as well as it once did, during breathing. Additionally, the main breathing muscle, the diaphragm, becomes weaker too. This will affect how much air a person is able to breathe in and out.

Furthermore, ageing affects lung tissue and the airways may lose their ability to stay open. Additionally, the air sacs begin to lose their shape. Consequently, air may become trapped in the lungs. This affects how well you’re able to breathe.

Why inspiratory muscle training?

Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) is a form of resistance training that exercises the inspiratory muscles. The main inspiratory muscles are the diaphragm and intercostals. It’s these muscles that are responsible for drawing air into the lungs. Furthermore, it’s these muscles that will be affected by ageing. Therefore, exercising these muscles with IMT will limit the effects of ageing. IMT will help them to become stronger and less prone to fatigue.

The IMT device that participants use in this trial is the POWERbreathe K5.

Participants breathe in through the K5 for 30 breaths. They perform this twice, with a one-minute interval between each set. After two weeks’ training, they must increase the training resistance by 10%. Researchers then assess an individual’s results following Pilates exercise.

Why Pilates?

Pilates is an exercise programme, developed in the 20th Century by Joseph Pilates. The exercises focus on improving core strength and muscular imbalance. Furthermore, Pilates improves flexibility, overall muscle strength and is low-impact, making it ideal for the age group in this study.

As we age, we become less active and more sedentary. Consequently, sitting for long periods limits movement and affects the body. In fact, age affects the entire musculoskeletal system: joints, muscles and bones. As a result, posture is affected and we also start to lose muscle tone, balance and joint mobility. Pilates can help to minimise these age-related changes.

For this study, participants use the Cadillac, Combo Chair and Reformer devices for the Pilates method. The researchers recommend nine exercises per session. Participants perform up to three sets of 12 repetitions of each exercise. They do this for a maximum of 45-minutes.

Study results

To establish if IMT positively effects breathing muscle strength, each participant’s maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is measured. MIP is an index of diaphragm strength and an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (longevity). Study findings show that MIP significantly evolved in the elderly. Additionally, the study highlights:

“the use of the POWERbreathe K5 device, which further favoured the gain in this variable.”

Findings also show:

“that all the variables were significantly better in the intervention groups than in the Control Group, thus strengthening the importance of the association between IMT and Pilates.”

In conclusion

“In conclusion, physiotherapy is an excellent ally in the prevention, promotion, and maintenance of health, quality of life and functional capacity in the gerontological population. The use of the Pilates Studio method, associated with technological equipment that allows more detailed analysis and treatment of pulmonary conditions, strength, function and mobility, was shown to be beneficial for this type of application.”

The influence of inspiratory muscle training combined with the Pilates method on lung function in elderly women: A randomized controlled trial >

Revolutionise your Sports Performance with Breathing Training

Your breathing can often be a limiting factor as you exercise, reducing your sports performance. It can let you down, preventing you from performing at your best as you stop to ‘catch your breath’. Consequently, breathing muscle training is a discipline elite coaches include to improve athletes’ breathing muscle strength and stamina. In fact, by performing breathing muscle training, an athlete’s breathing muscles will fatigue far less. As a result, athletes are able to continue with their training for longer before breathing exhaustion strikes. Consequently, the athlete’s sports performance improves.

How to Improve Your Sports Performance

Breathing muscles, the inspiratory muscles, play a vital role in the efficiency of breathing during exercise. Additionally, as you age the strength of your inspiratory muscles starts to reduce, even if you’re fit.

It is when you move out of your ‘comfort zone’ and you’re working above your lactate threshold that your breathing starts to increase steeply. You will perceive this as breathlessness, as your inspiratory muscle work increases.

To help prevent this from limiting your training sessions and ultimately your performance, it is beneficial to strengthen your inspiratory muscles. In order to do this, you must subject your breathing to a training stimulus.

Aerobic exercise can help to provide a training benefit to your inspiratory muscles, but it is not targeted and therefore sufficient enough.

Research shows that specific inspiratory muscle training:

Therefore, by training your inspiratory muscles daily with an inspiratory muscle training (IMT) device such as POWERbreathe:

  • You’ll experience an increase in resistance to fatigue – this will become apparent as you find yourself exercising for longer with less effort
  • Your breathing efficiency will improve – this is because your lungs will require less oxygen for the purpose of breathing, allowing more delivery to your other working muscles, such as your arms and legs

The result of these adaptations is an increase in sports performance.