Hospitalised Patients Benefit from POWERbreathe IMT

A new clinical trial in Brazil has found that POWERbreathe IMT improves inspiratory muscle strength and shortens the length of stay in hospitalised patients.

Objective

The aim of this double-blind randomised controlled trial is to assess the impact of IMT on hospitalised patients. IMT stands for Inspiratory Muscle Training. It trains the inspiratory muscles (the ones we use to breathe in) to become stronger and more resistant to fatigue. IMT is undertaken using the POWERbreathe Plus IMT device.

Proposed Outcomes for Hospitalised Patients

Hospitalised patients, with no existing respiratory issues, may encounter inpatient complications.

The clinical trial believes that, if implemented early, POWERbreathe IMT could prevent in-hospital adverse outcomes. These may, or may not, be directly associated with the loss of respiratory muscle mass inherent to a prolonged hospital stay.

Trial Method

Subjects are randomly assigned to either an IMT intervention group or an IMT sham group. Both groups were also to undergo conventional physiotherapy interventions.

The IMT intervention group performs IMT using the POWERbreathe Plus. Each patient trains against a load equivalent to 50% of their maximum inspiratory pressure. Maximum inspiratory pressure, or MIP, is a marker of respiratory muscle function and strength. All they need to do is breathe in through the device for 30 breaths. And they do this twice a day for 4 weeks.

Trial Results

Results show that patients in the IMT intervention group had a significantly shorter length of stay in hospital. They also show a lower risk of endotracheal intubation, muscle weakness and mortality.

Findings

The trial’s findings demonstrate that POWERbreathe IMT is a safe addition to physiotherapy. Results also show that it improves inspiratory muscle strength and functional status, as well as a shortened length of hospital stay.

Conclusion

This clinical trial shows that early implementation of POWERbreathe IMT is effective at preventing complications due to prolonged hospitalisation. It is also effective at reducing associated in-hospital mortality rates. Its therapeutic use is safe and well-tolerated in the hospital environment, providing respiratory gain and improving functional capacity.

Full details of this clinical trial are freely available for all to read on the internet. Safety and efficacy of inspiratory muscle training for preventing adverse outcomes in patients at risk of prolonged hospitalisation.

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