Metabolic reflection of respiratory muscles limiting athletic performance

We’re grateful to our friends Fit & Breathe Concept for bringing this article to our attention. It’s written by Germain Fernandez Monterrubio, Bachelor of Science in Physical Activity and Sport and can be found in its original language here: ‘El reflejo metabólico de la musculatura respiratoria como factor limitante del rendimiento deportivo’.

We’ve translated the original text as best we can (as follows), but if it is not entirely clear then you may also be interested in reading this research, published in The Journal (2007) of The Physiological Society, 'Insights into the role of the respiratory muscle metaboreflex'.

Metabolic reflection of the respiratory muscles as a limiting factor in athletic performance

Numerous studies show ventilatory fatigue (the inability of the respiratory muscles to achieve preural given pressure) (Chicharro, 2010) is considered as a limiting factor in performance, especially in disciplines that require endurance (such as marathon, rowing, swimming , triathlon etc).

One of the limiting factors that future studies will focus on is that of determining the specific influence of Metabolic Reflection of Respiratory Musculature (RMMR) in different cases.

The RMMR initiates fatigue of the respiratory muscles, which through III and IV afferents reach the supraspinal level, triggering a sympathetic response by vasoconstriction of peripheral muscle locomotive, which intensifies the fatigue of active muscles and increases also perception of effort, contributing to the limitation of return linked to intense aerobic exercise. (Romer and Polkey, 2008).

In aerobic performance, the TOTAL energy demand is not a limiting factor (Santalla, 2009), the production of energy in the time given is the determinant of fatigue... the "metaboreflex". Respiratory muscles induce a number of mechanisms by which respiratory muscle fatigue can affect exercise tolerance (Jack mackerel, 2010, Santalla 2010, Romer and Polkey, 2008), incurring a series of cardiorespiratory interactions:

Pulmonary level:

  • Fatigue contraction of the diaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration.
  • Increased reflexes activated metabolites.
  • Increased afferent discharge (track III and IV).

Muscular level:

  • Increased efferent sympathetic discharge.
  • Increased vasoconstriction members.
  • Decreased oxygen transport.
  • Increased locomotor muscle fatigue.
  • Increased perception of effort.

In an experiment carried out with cyclists (Fischer, 2013) participants were induced to metaboreflex with post-exercise muscle ischemia, indicating that the increase in heart rate and the partial withdrawal of cardiac parasympathetic tone, is mainly attributed to increased cardiac sympathetic activity, and only after exercise with large muscle masses.

We speak of respiratory muscles (and mechanical); of autonomic nervous, central nervous system and cardiovascular system regulation in humans. A review by Douglas R. Seals raised the premise that if the RMMR represented the "Robin Hood" of the body to the locomotor muscles (Seals, 2001), determining that this reflex can have as its main objective the delivery of oxygen to the respiratory muscles, guarantees the ability to maintain pulmonary ventilation, adequate regulation of the gases in the blood flow and the pH and general organ homeostasis. The reflection is considered the "vital organ" responsible for supporting lung function and perfusion of the respiratory muscles, especially during physiological states in which there is competition for cardiac output, as in the exercise to maximum and submaximal intensities. This overrides the locomotor muscles.

Usually this phenomenon is found in those training for a sport or competition in which there will normally be a struggle between the respiratory muscles and the locomotor muscles for blood flow. Determining this is not so simple, as it also depends on the intervention of the central nervous system, which impinge on some physiological and psychological responses, such as the perception of effort. Generalizing, we can say that to focus on metabolic compromise reflects both muscles (respiratory and locomotor) at maximal or submaximal, rather than related to aerobic capacity.

Author: Germain Fernandez Monterrubio, Bachelor of Science in Physical Activity and Sport.

www.fermentourbano.com

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REFERENCES

  • SEALS, DR. (2001). Robin Hood for the Lungs? A respiratory metaboreflex that “steals” blood flow from locomotor muscles. J Physiol. 537(Pt 1):2
  • FISHER, JP y otros (2013). Muscle metaboreflex and autonomic regulation of heart rate in humans. J Physiol. 591.15 pp 3777–3788 3777
  • ROMER, LM y POLKEY, MI (2008). Excercise-induced respiratory muscle fatigue: implications for performance. J App Physiol. 104 pp 3879 3888
  • SANTALLA, A (2010). Presentation High Performance Program. Physiological Basis of Sports Performance. SE
  • CHICHARRO LOPEZ, JL (2010). Presentation Respiratory muscle fatigue induced by exercise: implications for clinical and performance.
  • HAJ GHANBARI, B. et alt. (2012) Effects of respiratory muscle training on performance in athletes: a systematic review with meta-analyses. J. of Strength & Conditioning Research.

View list of published research that used POWERbreathe as the IMT intervention of choice in POWERbreathe in Research.

Find more published research on our Inspiratory Muscle Training Research blog.

If you found this interesting (and if you found the translation not entirely easy to follow), you'll probably find 'Insights into the role of the respiratory muscle metaboreflex' useful too.

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