The Effect of Inspiratory muscle Warm-Up on Submaximal Rowing Performance

This abstract (Epub ahead of print) published July 15th 2014 in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

STUDY:

The Effect of Inspiratory muscle Warm-Up on Submaximal Rowing Performance

Arend M, Mäestu J, Kivastik J, Rämson R, Jürimäe J

Abstract:

“Performing inspiratory muscle warm-up might increase exercise performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of inspiratory muscle warm-up to submaximal rowing performance and to find if there is an effect on lactic acid accumulation and breathing parameters. Performing inspiratory muscle warm-up might increase exercise performance.

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of inspiratory muscle warm-up to submaximal rowing performance and to find if there is an effect on lactic acid accumulation and breathing parameters.

Ten competitive male rowers between 19 and 27 years of age (age 23.1±3.8 yrs; height 188.1±6.3cm; body mass 85.6±6.6 kg) were tested three times. During the first visit maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) assessment and the incremental rowing test were carried out to measure maximal oxygen consumption and maximal aerobic power (Pamax). A submaximal intensity (90% Pamax) rowing test was carried out twice with the standard rowing warm-up as Test 1 and with the standard rowing warm-up and specific inspiratory muscle warm-up as Test 2.

During the two experimental tests, distance, duration, heart rate, breathing frequency, ventilation, peak oxygen consumption and blood lactate concentration were measured.

The only value that showed a significant difference between the Test 1 and Test 2 was breathing frequency (52.2±6.8 vs 53.1±6.8, respectively). Heart rate and ventilation showed a tendency to decrease and increase respectively after the inspiratory muscle warm-up (p<0.1). Despite some changes in respiratory parameters the use of 40% MIP intensity warm-up is not suggested if the mean intensity of the competition is at submaximal level (at approximately 90% VO2max). In conclusion, the warm-up protocol of the respiratory muscles used in this study does not have a significant influence on submaximal endurance performance in highly trained male rowers.

View the abstract here. 

OTHER RESEARCH SHOWING BENEFITS OF IMT WARM-UP:

View list of published research that used POWERbreathe as the IMT intervention of choice in POWERbreathe in Research.

Find more published research on our Inspiratory Muscle Training Research blog.

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