POWERbreathe Scientifically Proven Training Regimen

POWERbreathe Training Courtesy of Josephine Gull

Research continues to develop globally into the use of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for health, medical, sports and exercise benefits, and POWERbreathe has been the inspiratory muscle training device of choice used in research. POWERbreathe in Research lists these research papers and meta-analysis.

POWERbreathe has also undergone rigorous and systematic testing to identify the most effective training regimen, and in this blog we’ll be looking at this testing.

Scientific Testing

Here’s a list of the 3 research papers that resulted in the scientifically proven training regimen:

  1. Specificity and Reversibility of Inspiratory Muscle Training (Lee M. Romer, Alison K. McConnell)
  2. Acute Cardiorespiratory Responses to Inspiratory Pressure Threshold Loading (Alison K. McConnell, Lisa A. Griffiths)
  3. The Inspiratory Muscles can be Trained Differentially to Increase Strength or Endurance Using a Pressure Threshold, Inspiratory Muscle Training Device (M.P. Caine, A.K. McConnell)

1. Specificity and Reversibility of Inspiratory Muscle Training

PURPOSE: “The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pressure-flow specificity of adaptations to inspiratory muscle training (IMT), in addition to the temporal effects of detraining and reduced frequency of training upon these adaptations.”

IMT DEVICE USED: POWERbreathe

CONCLUSION: “These data support the notion of pressure-flow specificity of IMT. Detraining resulted in small but significant reductions in inspiratory muscle function. Reducing training frequency by two thirds allowed for the maintenance of inspiratory muscle function up to 18 wk post-IMT.”

2. Acute Cardiorespiratory Responses to Inspiratory Pressure Threshold Loading

PURPOSE: “We tested the acute responses to differing pressure threshold inspiratory loading intensities in well-trained rowers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 1) how the magnitude of inspiratory pressure threshold loading influences repetition maximum (RM), tidal volume (VT), and external work undertaken by the inspiratory muscle; and 2) whether the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex is activated during acute inspiratory pressure threshold loading.”

IMT DEVICE USED: POWERbreathe

CONCLUSION: “Although all loads elicited a sustained increase in fc, only the 60% load elicited a sustained rise in mean arterial blood pressure (P = 0.016), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.015), and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.002), providing evidence for a metaboreflex response at this load.”

3. The Inspiratory Muscles can be Trained Differentially to Increase Strength or Endurance Using a Pressure Threshold, Inspiratory Muscle Training Device (Eur. Respir. J. 12:58–59, 1998)

ABSTRACT: Traditionally resistive training has been used to increase respiratory muscle strength whilst hyperpnea or flow biased training regimes have been utilised to increase endurance (Leith, D.E. and Bradley M. J. Appl. Physiol. 1976; 41(4): 508-516). The present study examined whether resistive loading can train the inspiratory muscles differentially.

Sixteen adults were allocated randomly to either a high intensity (HI) or low intensity (LOW) training group. Both groups used an inspiratory muscle trainer (POWERbreathe®) twice daily for 4 weeks. The HI group trained at a resistance equivalent to 50% of their peak inspiratory mouth pressure (pMIP) for 30 breaths. The LOW group trained at a resistance equivalent to 30% of their pMIP for 200 breaths.

Following habituation, measures of respiratory muscle strength and inspiratory muscle endurance were obtained pre-, immediately post-, and also 12 weeks post-training.

Following training the HI group increased inspiratory muscle strength by 31.2% and endurance by 27.8%. The LOW group increased strength by 14.3% and endurance by 29.7%.

After 12 weeks detraining subjects in both groups lost only a small percentage of the improvements in inspiratory muscle function. These results demonstrate that pressure threshold resistive inspiratory muscle training can be utilised to train specifically for improvements in strength or endurance and that the improvements are maintained well post-training.

The Resulting Scientifically Proven POWERbreathe Training Regimen

These laboratory tests concluded that in order to get the maximum benefit from POWERbreathe inspiratory muscle training, POWERbreathe should be used for just 30 breaths twice a day. And after four to six weeks, because the inspiratory muscles will have improved substantially after following the recommended training regimen, it was found that maintenance training could be implemented. This means that in order to maintain the level of improved breathing, you do not need to use POWERbreathe every day and instead only every other day. This was found to be sufficient for continuing to enjoy the benefits achieved.

Read more about How POWERbreathe Works and its Benefits in sport and exercise, performing arts, health and medical, and the uniformed services. 

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